Amateur telescope eyepiece filters

  1. So, I have a relatively small (6") Orion Dobsonian with a 25mm and 7.5mm Plossl eyepieces and live in a somewhat light polluted area. Because of this, I am considering purchasing an eyepiece filter to reduce light pollution and enhance nebula/planetary viewing. I was wondering how this would affect my viewing with my eyepiece's and their eye relief. Also, I was wondering if these filters really are effective enough to enhance the details with my scope. Here are the filters I'm considering:

    http://www.telescope.com/control/ac...-narrowband-light-pollution-telescope-filters

    http://www.telescope.com/control/ac...on-mars-observation-telescope-eyepiece-filter
     
  2. jcsd
  3. chemisttree

    chemisttree 3,721
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    Those will both work great. Don't forget to get a variable polarizer as well to darken the moon as well. On sale now at Orion for $37.95. Great value IMHO.

    These filters screw onto the bottom of your eyepiece and won't affect your eye relief. They lengthen your eyepiece by a quarter inch or so but that shouldn't cause any issues.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2010
  4. Chronos

    Chronos 10,132
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    Filters are a good option for moon photography. For nebula, extending your tube will help a lot with light pollution without sacrificing aperature. All you need to do is tape about a 2 foot piece of rolled up parchment paper to the end of your scope. Spray paint the inside flat black.
     
  5. I've gotten great pictures of the moon and planets, I wasn't even considering nebula photography. Is it really as simple as taping a piece of paper to the end of my scope?
     
  6. chemisttree

    chemisttree 3,721
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    No, it isn't by my experience. You aren't going to be doing much nebula photography with a dob mount unless you can convert it to a tracking mount. The rolled up paper will only cut stray light entering from relatively close sources like a streetlamp. Skyglow will be entirely unaffected by that light shield.

    For nebula, try a nebula or OIII filter as well. Astronomics has one for about $50 that works pretty well.
     
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