Answer: Bernoulli's Equation: How Does It Create High/Low Pressure?

In summary, Bernoulli's principle is a manifestation of conservation of energy, stating that the total pressure or energy is constant along a streamline. This means that when there is an area of high velocity, there is also a higher velocity pressure, resulting in a lower static pressure by conservation of energy. In other words, the pressure is directly related to the force, distance, and mass, and can be expressed as energy gained per unit mass.
  • #1
skaboy607
108
0
Hi,

Hopefully a very simple question for someone that knows; We know from Bernoulli's principle that an area of high velocity creates an area of low pressure and vice versa. My question is how is this created?

Thanks
 
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  • #2
It is a manifestation of conservation of energy. And to be more accurate and descriptive, Bernoulli's principle states that the total pressure (ie, the energy) is constant along a streamline. So when you have an area of higher velocity, you get a higher velocity pressure - and by conservation of energy, the static pressure must be lower.
 
  • #3
russ_watters said:
… pressure (ie, the energy) …

Just to enlarge on that:

pressure = force/area,

so pressure/density = force times distance/mass = work done/mass = energy gained/mass :wink:
 

Related to Answer: Bernoulli's Equation: How Does It Create High/Low Pressure?

1. What is Bernoulli's equation?

Bernoulli's equation is a fundamental principle in fluid dynamics that describes the relationship between pressure, velocity, and elevation in a fluid flow. It states that as the velocity of a fluid increases, the pressure decreases, and vice versa.

2. How does Bernoulli's equation create high and low pressure?

Bernoulli's equation states that as the velocity of a fluid increases, the pressure decreases. Therefore, when a fluid speeds up, such as when it flows through a narrow channel, the pressure decreases, creating a low-pressure area. Conversely, when a fluid slows down, such as when it flows through a wider area, the pressure increases, creating a high-pressure area.

3. What factors affect the pressure created by Bernoulli's equation?

The factors that affect the pressure created by Bernoulli's equation are the velocity of the fluid, the density of the fluid, and the elevation or height of the fluid. Additionally, the shape of the channel or flow path can also impact the pressure created.

4. Can Bernoulli's equation be applied to all fluids?

No, Bernoulli's equation is only applicable to inviscid fluids, meaning fluids with no viscosity or internal friction. Real fluids, such as air and water, have viscosity and other properties that affect their flow and cannot be accurately described by Bernoulli's equation.

5. What are some real-world applications of Bernoulli's equation?

Bernoulli's equation has numerous applications in various fields, including aviation, hydrodynamics, and engineering. Some examples include airplane wings and propellers, water turbines, and carburetors. It is also used in medical devices, such as ventilators and nebulizers, to accurately control the flow of fluids.

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