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Antibiotic resistant super bug quickly spreading in U.S. and Canada.

  1. Apr 24, 2010 #1
    http://chattahbox.com/health/2010/04/24/deadly-airborne-fungus-spreading-fast-kills-one-out-of-four/

    A bizarre airborne fungus which has a mortality rate of 25% is spreading quickly in the United and Canada. Apparently it is completely immune to the effects of antibiotics, and there is no known way of treating it.

    It kills One in every Four, even if it's victim is young and healthy.

    It can also infect animals including cats and dogs.

    This is far more serious than the swine flu, which was very similar to the seasonal human influenza and a mortality rate of around 2%.

    Containment/quarantine is impossible.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 24, 2010 #2

    Evo

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  4. Apr 24, 2010 #3
    Is this fungal pathogen spread as easily as the common cold, or influenza? Are we going to see an explosion of Thousands of new cases in the coming weeks and months?
     
  5. Apr 24, 2010 #4

    Andy Resnick

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    heh... evolution in action. It's resistant to amphotericin B because of the polysaccharide encapsulation.
     
  6. Apr 24, 2010 #5
    Is this illness passed on from person to person? Like influenza? If so, then we have a mighty serious problem on our hands...
     
  7. Apr 24, 2010 #6
    No one knows how it is passed, other then its presumed to be inhaled.
    They have not even been able to contain a live sample, from out of doors, they just can't find it.
    With affected rates of 20 per million{over 5 years}, population and death rates of 8 people per million{over 5 years}, means you almost have no chance of dieing from this.
     
  8. Apr 24, 2010 #7
    If this fungal pathogen, whatever it's called, is both airborne, and capable of human to human transmission, and has a 25% mortality rate, we do indeed have a dire problem on our hands.

    Just as if the Ebola virus (fatality rate 90-100%) were to mutate into an airborne strain and sweep across the entire world. But all of the current strains of the Ebola virus can only be transmitted much like HIV, through direct physical contact with infected biological material such as blood.

    The consequences of an airborne mutation of hemorrhagic fever would be absolutely catastrophic, world-wide.

    I think the means of how deadly diseases are transmitted are far more serious than any other factor. Just like this fungus thing.

    *25% mortality rate.
    *Airborne.
    *May or may not be capable of human to human transmission?
     
  9. Apr 25, 2010 #8

    Ygggdrasil

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    From the article:
    (emphasis mine).

    So, it's not really a 25% mortality rate. Maybe 25% of those who show symptoms serious enough to go to a doctor and get diagnosed may die, but definitely not 25% of those exposed. Likely the immune systems of most healthy people are able to fight off the pathogen, explaining why most people never show symptoms.
     
  10. Apr 25, 2010 #9
    I wonder what's considered as 'most'??? From what I saw the other day when I was at the doctors office people go to visit the doctor for veryyy very mild symptoms so it would surprise me if it meant 'majority of people'. However I think 25% mortality rate of known infections is high enough to warrant concern... especially if it is airborne.

    Evo, what did you mean when you said it's just 'scare mongering?' I think people are being unfair and super critical of the WHO and other health organizations because of how 'mild' particular outbreaks were.
     
  11. Apr 25, 2010 #10

    Ygggdrasil

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    That most of the people in the doctor's office have very mild symptoms does not imply that most people with very mild symptoms go to the doctor's office (esp. considering a significant portion of the US population does not have access to a GP).
     
  12. Apr 25, 2010 #11

    Evo

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    Did you read the link I posted to the other thread?
     
  13. Apr 25, 2010 #12
    I live in Canada, everyone has access to a GP. It is true that not everyone would go but I don't see why that matters. 25% is still quite a high mortality rate.
     
  14. Apr 25, 2010 #13
    Yeah I did read it, and nothing in the article leads me to believe that this fungus doesn't warrant attention. I don't see your point in asking me this when I specifically asked you why you said what you said... you've answered nothing of my question.

    It's new, it's pretty deadly, and it has the ability to possibly spread and we are not sure how to deal with it. = Warrants concern. Should you go out and buy a hazmat suit and prepare to lock yourself up? No... but who said anything of the sort??
     
  15. Apr 26, 2010 #14

    Monique

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    Please read this information:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  16. Apr 26, 2010 #15
    So it cannot be transmitted from person to person?
     
  17. Apr 26, 2010 #16

    russ_watters

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    "...not readily..."
     
  18. Apr 26, 2010 #17

    russ_watters

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    1. It infects (enough to see a doctor) single-digit numbers of people a year.
    From the CNN source:
    2. "Overall it's a pretty low threat, and it's still uncommon in the area..."
    3. "...this is never going to be a very common condition..."
    4. "In fact, he says, if this fungus follows previous patterns, it's very possible that the virulence will decline with time."
     
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