Any clues to the origin of this pic (cross section of teeth)

In summary: This video youtu.be/qwbIu2PzCRs?t=62 shows the following picture. I'm guessing it's either Arabic or Persian. Can someone read the text and say if it gives any clues to its age and origin?If it's even of medieval vintage, it would be pretty remarkable, implying that they may have used some kind of lens to see the blood vessels(?) or other structures within the sectioned teeth. (Although they did embellish it with some fanciful extra details!)Google translate might be able to decode it. It has a camera feature on phones so you can image it and it will do the translation.Anything beyond that is a needle in a hay
  • #1
Swamp Thing
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At [01:02], this video youtu.be/qwbIu2PzCRs?t=62 shows the following picture. I'm guessing it's either Arabic or Persian. Can someone read the text and say if it gives any clues to its age and origin?

If it's even of medieval vintage, it would be pretty remarkable, implying that they may have used some kind of lens to see the blood vessels(?) or other structures within the sectioned teeth. (Although they did embellish it with some fanciful extra details!)

1609565015073.png
 
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  • #2
Google translate might be able to decode it. It has a camera feature on phones so you can image it and it will do the translation.

Anything beyond that is a needle in a haystack unless someone knows the books or owns the teeth.
 
  • #4
So it's 18th century Turkish.

Just for fun I tried Google translate --- it says "no Turkish found".

In detect language mode it says it's Arabic and translates it as : "The Shaw nursery is suitable for a mobile phone. The suggestion of Alabgal and Al Suwal".
 
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  • #5
Funny google.

It could be from this book. Not saying it is, but is still interesting.
Excerpt
To our knowledge, three handwritten copies of the Jarrāhiyyāt alKhaniyya remain. One copy is kept in the Bibliothèque Nationale de France (National Library of France) in Paris, one in the Fatih Millet Library in Istanbul, and one in the Medical History Department of Istanbul University Çapa Faculty of Medicine. Each copy is unique, and each copy has a different number of pages. These differences may be because two of the copies were written by Sabuncuoğlu himself, but one copy dates to later in the 18th century. In 1992, the Turkish medical historian Prof. İlter Uzel conducted meticulous research on the three copies and then published them in Turkish, Arabic, and English (1–4, 6, 7, 9, 11, 13–16, 18).
https://jag.journalagent.com/erciyesmedj/pdfs/EMJ_42_3_350_353.pdf
which is where the previous gets its 18th book reference , but Sharaf al-Dīn Sabuncuoğlu (1385-c.1468) .

More about Sabuncuoğlu
https://www.dailysabah.com/arts/por...-physician-and-pharmacologist-of-15th-century

Other sites I visited
18th century illustrations don't look like the one in question.
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/324498512_MiratulEbdan_Fi_Tesrih-i_Azaul-Insan_First_printed_illustrated_anatomy_book_in_Ottoman-Turkish_medicine

History of dentistry in the Ottoman empire
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/278671470_History_of_Dentistry_from_the_Period_of_the_Ottoman_Empire_to_the_Republican_Period_1
 
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Related to Any clues to the origin of this pic (cross section of teeth)

1. What is the purpose of studying the cross section of teeth?

The cross section of teeth can provide valuable information about the structure, composition, and development of teeth, which can help in understanding their function and evolution.

2. How does the cross section of teeth differ from a regular tooth?

The cross section of teeth allows for a closer examination of the different layers and structures within a tooth, such as the enamel, dentin, and pulp, which cannot be seen in a regular tooth.

3. Can the cross section of teeth reveal any information about the diet of an individual?

Yes, the cross section of teeth can provide clues about the types of food an individual consumed, as certain types of food can leave distinct marks on the teeth, such as wear patterns or mineral deposits.

4. Is it possible to determine the age of a tooth from its cross section?

Yes, by examining the layers of dentin and enamel in the cross section, scientists can estimate the age of a tooth and its growth rate, which can be useful in studying the development and lifespan of different species.

5. Can the cross section of teeth help in identifying the species of an individual?

Yes, the cross section of teeth can provide important information about the shape, size, and arrangement of teeth, which can be used to identify the species of an individual or compare it to other known species.

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