Anybody graduate from Yale's astronomy program?

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  • Thread starter Avner
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  • #1
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How hard was it to get in? How was your experience?

I currently study finance(1 year done) and I got accepted to the University of New Haven on scholarship. I plan on taking extra classes in math and physics, so if I decide to pursue a degree in astronomy I will have the pre reqs done. Unfortunately, the only astronomy program near me is Yale's, the hardest school to get into. I wish I could study astronomy for undergraduate, but I can't risk not having a job(and I'm still behind in math). I plan on using my finance degree to fund the education I really want.
 

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  • #2
DrSteve
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Yours is the wrong approach to thinking about graduate school in Astronomy. Anyone seriously considering graduate school would not restrict himself to a program based solely on proximity.
 
  • #3
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Yours is the wrong approach to thinking about graduate school in Astronomy. Anyone seriously considering graduate school would not restrict himself to a program based solely on proximity.
In theory, yes. In practice, many do have a restriction.

OP: Peterson's says that they have roughly a ~22% acceptance rate (in the year the data was taken, 40 applied, 9 accepted), and frankly I don't think that's horrible. (https://www.petersons.com/graduate-...ces-department-of-astronomy-000_10044024.aspx)
 
  • #4
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Yours is the wrong approach to thinking about graduate school in Astronomy. Anyone seriously considering graduate school would not restrict himself to a program based solely on proximity.
Why is my approach wrong? The approach I'm taking is what works best for me. Who's covering my out of state tuition and living expenses?
 
  • #6
jtbell
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Yours is the wrong approach to thinking about graduate school in Astronomy.
He's talking about undergraduate, not grad school. (I think... Avner, can you clarify?)
 
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He's talking about undergraduate, not grad school. (I think... Avner, can you clarify?)
Yes, I was.
 
  • #8
eri
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There are very few jobs in astronomy, and many are short appointments (postdocs, fellowships, visiting professor / researcher, etc.). If you're not capable of moving every few years for the next 10+ years, astronomy is probably not a good choice for you. There's a ton of competition for the few jobs out there, so you need to be willing to move just about anywhere in the world to take a job. That includes moving across the country for grad school or to transfer to a school with a stronger undergrad program. It's unfortunate, but it's not going to change anytime soon.
 
  • #9
radium
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All the people I know who graduated from Yale had a very positive experience. However, Yale undergrad has an acceptance rate of roughly 6%. Transfer acceptance rates are usually significantly lower than those out of high school. Unless you are truly outstanding academically you will not get in.

Why don't you consider other state schools?
 
  • #10
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There are very few jobs in astronomy, and many are short appointments (postdocs, fellowships, visiting professor / researcher, etc.). If you're not capable of moving every few years for the next 10+ years, astronomy is probably not a good choice for you. There's a ton of competition for the few jobs out there, so you need to be willing to move just about anywhere in the world to take a job. That includes moving across the country for grad school or to transfer to a school with a stronger undergrad program. It's unfortunate, but it's not going to change anytime soon.
Totally agree. That is why I am choosing to study finance now and hedging my bets.
 
  • #11
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All the people I know who graduated from Yale had a very positive experience. However, Yale undergrad has an acceptance rate of roughly 6%. Transfer acceptance rates are usually significantly lower than those out of high school. Unless you are truly outstanding academically you will not get in.

Why don't you consider other state schools?
If what dish soap gave is accurate, then the astronomy apartment has a higher acceptance rate; although, still competitive. There are no other astronomy programs in CT, that I am aware of.
 
  • #12
jtbell
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Why limit yourself to CT for grad school? Ph.D. students normally get a stipend and tuition remission, giving them enough money, net, to live on regardless of whether they're in-state or out-of-state.
 
  • #13
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Why limit yourself to CT for grad school? Ph.D. students normally get a stipend and tuition remission, giving them enough money, net, to live on regardless of whether they're in-state or out-of-state.
I'm not pursing a graduate degree. I simply want to study astronomy for myself. I am getting my finance degree and many who graduate from the finance program at my school get jobs where they did their internships. So, if I am working in CT, then I am limited to where I can go. Unless, I can obtain a job in a different state that has an astronomy program.
 
  • #14
radium
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Yale undergrad admissions is not done by department. You apply with an intended major but the people look at your application is the undergrad admissions committee. Graduate school admissions are done by department.
 
  • #15
jtbell
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Are you sure that Yale would allow you to apply for an undergraduate degree if you already have one? I couldn't find an explicit statement allowing or forbidding this, in a quick scan of their admissions pages. They do have a category for non-degree students, but it's maybe five students per year.
 

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