Applications of hypothetical new material

  • Thread starter cbrons
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  • #1
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Lay person here...

If there was a new metal that was discovered with extremely high electrical conductivity and corrosion resistance but no thermal conductivity, what do you image its industrial uses might be?
 

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  • #2
Nugatory
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"No thermal conductivity" is of course not physically realizable, especially a metal, but one could imagine materials with relatively low thermal conductivity.
 
  • #3
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"No thermal conductivity" is of course not physically realizable, especially a metal, but one could imagine materials with relatively low thermal conductivity.

Yes sir, it's just a thought experiment.

I was thinking this would have applications in electronics? Does thermal conductivity correlate inversely with how good an element is in certain industrial applications?
 
  • #4
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Yes sir, it's just a thought experiment.

I was thinking this would have applications in electronics? Does thermal conductivity correlate inversely with how good an element is in certain industrial applications?
Power transmission seems the most obvious application.
 
  • #5
Danger
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Structural insulation; HVAC systems; domestic and commercial refrigerators... really, the uses are endless.
The corrosion resistance aspect would seem to indicate extensive potential in nuclear reactors and rocket engines.
 
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  • #6
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Unfortunately, electronic and heat conductance are linked quite closely.

Anyway: For electronics and power transmission, you usually want to get rid of heat, so thermal conductivity is good and the material here would be bad. Such a material would make electric connections to very hot and/or very cold places (like superconductors) easier.
 
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  • #7
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Unfortunately, electronic and heat conductance are linked quite closely.

Anyway: For electronics and power transmission, you usually want to get rid of heat, so thermal conductivity is good and the material here would be bad. Such a material would make electric connections to very hot and/or very cold places (like superconductors) easier.
Could you see any use in nuclear reactors and rocket engines?
 
  • #8
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If we also have electronics that can resist high temperatures (and ideally also radiation in case of nuclear reactors), maybe for some monitoring electronics? But then some thermal conductivity wouldn't be so problematic I think.
 
  • #9
Danger
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I was thinking along the line of piping between the core and the heat exchanger system.
 

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