Applied Force Vs. tension Force

In summary, a dock worker is pulling two boxes connected by a rope on a horizontal floor. The boxes weigh 850 N and 750 N respectively, and there is friction present. The question is about the direction of the applied force and the tension force on Box B. The friction force is the maximum force needed to overcome the resistance to sliding, and the tension in the rope is balanced by the friction. If the applied force is not enough to overcome the resistance, the boxes will not move.
  • #1
enantiomer1
13
0

Homework Statement


hey just having a hard time figuring out a question about tension and applied force:
A dock worker pulls two boxes connected by a rope on a horizontal floor, as shown in the figure (Intro 1 figure) . All the ropes are horizontal, and there is some friction with the floor.
the boxes are 850 N (A) and 750 N (B) respectively, all I need to know is direction of applied force and tension force on Box B
I think it should look something like <----Friction force (Box B) ----->Tension and Applied force
but some how I don't think that's right
 
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  • #2
Friction is the maximum force needed to overcome the resistance to sliding. If you don't pull enough to overcome the resistance as given by the coefficient times the weight, then of course it doesn't move. And the tension of the rope is completely balanced by the friction.

So if you are pulling on a rope then the tension in the rope is against the friction, and of course in the event you get it to moving then, the excess would go into accelerating the motion of the mass of the box after that.
 
  • #3



Hello,

The direction of the applied force and tension force on Box B will depend on the direction in which the dock worker is pulling the rope. If the dock worker is pulling the rope towards Box B, the applied force and tension force will both be in the same direction, and the friction force will be in the opposite direction to prevent Box B from moving. However, if the dock worker is pulling the rope away from Box B, the applied force and tension force will be in opposite directions, and the friction force will be in the same direction as the applied force to prevent Box B from moving.

In general, the applied force refers to the force that is being applied to an object, while the tension force refers to the force that is transmitted through a rope, string, or other type of flexible connector. In this scenario, the applied force is being exerted by the dock worker on the rope, and the tension force is being transmitted through the rope to both boxes. The friction force, on the other hand, is a resistance force that is caused by the interaction between the boxes and the floor.

I hope this helps clarify the concept of applied force and tension force in this scenario. Let me know if you have any further questions.
 

Related to Applied Force Vs. tension Force

What is the difference between applied force and tension force?

Applied force refers to the force that is applied to an object or system, typically by an outside force or agent. Tension force, on the other hand, is a type of force that is exerted by a rope, cable, or any other type of stretched material. In other words, tension force is the force that is transmitted through a material when it is pulled or stretched.

How are applied force and tension force related?

Applied force and tension force are related in the sense that both involve the application of a force to an object or system. However, applied force is typically applied directly to the object, while tension force is transmitted through a material that is in contact with the object.

What are some examples of applied force and tension force?

Examples of applied force include pushing a shopping cart, kicking a ball, or lifting weights. Examples of tension force include pulling on a rope, stretching a rubber band, or holding a heavy object with a cable.

How do applied force and tension force affect an object or system?

Applied force and tension force can both cause an object or system to accelerate or change its motion. However, applied force can also cause an object to deform or break, while tension force can cause an object to stretch or compress depending on the direction of the force.

Can applied force and tension force cancel each other out?

Yes, applied force and tension force can cancel each other out if they are equal in magnitude and opposite in direction. For example, if you apply a force of 10 Newtons to the right and a tension force of 10 Newtons to the left, the object will remain in equilibrium and not move.

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