Applying to a Ph.D. and not getting in - M.S.?

  • Admissions
  • Thread starter Chubigans
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Ph.d Ph.d.
In summary: Basically, if you have been working for two years in a relevant field, and your work is solid and shows some maturity, then your application will be looked at more favorably. However, if you only have work experience in a certain field, or if your work experiences do not have anything to do with your academic interests, your application might be looked at less favorably.
  • #1
Chubigans
21
0
Hey there,

I have been out of school for two years in the work world, so I think my application isn't as strong as I'd like it to be in terms of applying to Ph.D. Programs. I have a simple nuts-and-bolts question about it:

If I take a "moonshot" and apply to just Ph.D. programs, will this "include" an application to the associated master's programs? By this I mean, if they think I'm a qualified candidate for the M.S., will I be admitted for that instead of the Ph.D.? Or do I have to separately apply for each M.S. program?

Thanks for your help.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Chubigans said:
Hey there,

I have been out of school for two years in the work world, so I think my application isn't as strong as I'd like it to be in terms of applying to Ph.D. Programs. I have a simple nuts-and-bolts question about it:

If I take a "moonshot" and apply to just Ph.D. programs, will this "include" an application to the associated master's programs? By this I mean, if they think I'm a qualified candidate for the M.S., will I be admitted for that instead of the Ph.D.? Or do I have to separately apply for each M.S. program?

Thanks for your help.

No. If I understand the procedure correctly, they will admit you to only the program that you applied for, nothing more, and nothing less.

There is nothing that makes your application "weaker" just because you have been working for the past 2 years. If anything, and if your work has some related benefits (i.e. you worked with computers, or you worked as a technician, or you were in the military, or if you worked as a manager, etc.), this might be beneficial to your application by showing your level of maturity and levelheadedness.

Of course, if you only apply to the MITs, the Harvards, and the Princetons, then I withdraw my suggestion on your maturity and levelheadedness! :)

Zz.
 
  • #3
Nope, I'm applying to a B school, but the problem is, I didn't get along with my research professors as well as my work bosses, so I won't have many good "academic" references, which is the main worry. (Just had personal issues with 2 out of 3 of my research professors... so I wouldn't ask them for a recommendation.)
 
  • #4
Chubigans said:
Hey there,

I have been out of school for two years in the work world, so I think my application isn't as strong as I'd like it to be in terms of applying to Ph.D. Programs. I have a simple nuts-and-bolts question about it:

If I take a "moonshot" and apply to just Ph.D. programs, will this "include" an application to the associated master's programs? By this I mean, if they think I'm a qualified candidate for the M.S., will I be admitted for that instead of the Ph.D.? Or do I have to separately apply for each M.S. program?

Thanks for your help.

The schools that will consider you for both MS and PhD will usually offer unfunded (or partially funded in the best non-PhD scenario) MS should you fail to get in for the PhD but not rejected outright. However, the list of such schools is pretty short:

Stony Brook
Rochester (or at least used to; there is one recorded instance of a Rochester applicant being rejected and offered a MS with 50% funding instead)
Brown

plus other lesser-known schools that I might have missed.

Or you can always try your hands for a MS abroad...
 
  • #5
Chubigans said:
Hey there,

I have been out of school for two years in the work world, so I think my application isn't as strong as I'd like it to be in terms of applying to Ph.D. Programs. I have a simple nuts-and-bolts question about it:

If I take a "moonshot" and apply to just Ph.D. programs, will this "include" an application to the associated master's programs? By this I mean, if they think I'm a qualified candidate for the M.S., will I be admitted for that instead of the Ph.D.? Or do I have to separately apply for each M.S. program?

Thanks for your help.

Not by default, but it does happen. A friend of mine applied to a PhD program and the folks there liked him but they already had sufficient students in the PhD program so they added him into their masters program and he went from there under the assumptions that once he was done with his masters he'd be continuing on with the PhD program. Might want to contact the individual school.
 

Related to Applying to a Ph.D. and not getting in - M.S.?

1. Why was I not accepted into a Ph.D. program after completing my M.S.?

There could be a variety of reasons why you were not accepted into a Ph.D. program after completing your M.S. Some possible reasons could include a competitive applicant pool, a lack of research experience or publications, a low GPA, or a weak statement of purpose or letters of recommendation. It's important to reach out to the program you applied to for specific feedback on your application.

2. Should I reapply to the same Ph.D. program after being rejected with my M.S.?

It's not uncommon for applicants to apply to a Ph.D. program more than once before being accepted. If you are passionate about the program and believe you have improved your qualifications since your previous application, it may be worth reapplying. However, it's also important to continue exploring other programs and opportunities.

3. Is it common to be rejected from all Ph.D. programs after completing an M.S.?

It is not uncommon to be rejected from Ph.D. programs after completing an M.S. The competition for Ph.D. programs can be very high, and many applicants have strong qualifications and experience. It's important to keep in mind that one rejection does not define your potential for success in the future.

4. Should I pursue a Ph.D. if I was not accepted after completing an M.S.?

The decision to pursue a Ph.D. is a personal one and should be based on your career goals, interests, and passions. Being rejected from a Ph.D. program does not necessarily mean you are not capable of completing a Ph.D. However, it's important to carefully evaluate your qualifications and the competitiveness of the programs you are interested in before making a decision.

5. What can I do to improve my chances of being accepted into a Ph.D. program after completing an M.S.?

There are several steps you can take to improve your chances of being accepted into a Ph.D. program after completing an M.S. These may include gaining more research experience or publications, improving your GPA, strengthening your statement of purpose and letters of recommendation, and applying to a wider range of programs. It's also important to reach out to programs for feedback on your application and to continue developing your skills and qualifications.

Similar threads

  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
4
Views
890
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
9
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
8
Views
2K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
13
Views
2K
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
9
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
13
Views
2K
Back
Top