Archimedes' Problem: Iron Body Submerged in Water

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In summary, the conversation discusses the calculation of the apparent weight of an iron body submerged in water. The volume of the iron body is first determined using the density of the liquid and the weight in air. Then, the equation E=dVg is used to calculate the apparent weight, which is found to be -1.47N. The conversation also discusses finding the correct volume of the iron body and using the basic definition for density in the calculation.
  • #1
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i have the following problem:
-an iron (7800kg/m3) body is submerged into in water (density = 1000kg/m3)
his weight in the air is 0,13N.

what i did is:

E=dVg (Push force, density of the liquid, volume of the body sumerged and gravity, respectively)

then:
the volume of the iron body is 0,000633m3, then:

E = 1000*0,000633g = 1,60

so, the the apparent weight is 0,13-1,60= -1,47N
______________________________
did I do it right?
 
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  • #2
how did you get volume of iron body as that? and how do you get 1000*0.000633*g = 1.60??

find volume correctly first. see that actual weight is 0.13N, therefore m = 0.13/g Kg. use density to find volume.

tell us what you get.
 
  • #3
germangb said:
i have the following problem:
-an iron (7800kg/m3) body is submerged into in water (density = 1000kg/m3)
his weight in the air is 0,13N.

what i did is:

E=dVg (Push force, density of the liquid, volume of the body sumerged and gravity, respectively)

then:
the volume of the iron body is 0,000633m3, then:

E = 1000*0,000633g = 1,60

so, the the apparent weight is 0,13-1,60= -1,47N
______________________________
did I do it right?

Use basic definition for density.
Volume(iron) = .13/(g*density)=1.699x10^-6 m3

Weight of iron in water = (weight in air) - dVg = .1133N

I'm open for correction.
 

What is Archimedes' Problem: Iron Body Submerged in Water?

Archimedes' Problem: Iron Body Submerged in Water, also known as Archimedes' Principle, is a scientific law that states that the buoyant force on an object immersed in a fluid is equal to the weight of the fluid that the object displaces.

Who was Archimedes and why is this problem named after him?

Archimedes was a Greek mathematician, physicist, engineer, inventor, and astronomer who lived in the 3rd century BC. He is credited with discovering and formulating the principle that explains the behavior of objects submerged in fluids, which is why this problem is named after him.

What is the significance of Archimedes' Problem in science?

Archimedes' Problem is significant in science because it explains the concept of buoyancy and is the basis for many other important principles and equations in physics. It has applications in various fields such as engineering, naval architecture, and even biology.

How is Archimedes' Problem solved?

To solve Archimedes' Problem, you need to know the density of the object and the density of the fluid it is submerged in. You can then use the formula: Buoyant force = (Density of fluid) x (Volume of displaced fluid) x (Acceleration due to gravity). If the buoyant force is greater than the weight of the object, it will float, and if it is less, it will sink.

What are some examples of Archimedes' Problem in everyday life?

Some examples of Archimedes' Problem in everyday life include boats floating in water, hot air balloons rising in the air, and helium balloons floating in the atmosphere. It also explains why some objects float in water while others sink, based on their densities.

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