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Around 9.03 the lady says there's rum in the cupboard

  1. Aug 16, 2010 #1
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 16, 2010 #2

    Danger

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    Re: rum

    With no labels on the bottles, it's impossible to tell. One could be white rum, and the other an amber or dark rum.
    Most likely, though, they are both coloured water, flat pop, etc.; real alcohol is essentially never used by actors.
     
  4. Aug 16, 2010 #3

    lisab

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    Re: rum

    Sniff 'em.
     
  5. Aug 16, 2010 #4

    Evo

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    Re: rum

    Why did they mix them?
     
  6. Aug 16, 2010 #5
    Re: rum

    Thanks, everyone.

    Dan, why would they mix white rum with dark rum/amber ale? Does it improve taste?

    Evo, I have seen this practice in many movies, especially Indian movies. I myself would like to know the reason.
     
  7. Aug 16, 2010 #6
    Re: rum

    The dark colored bottle is rum. The colorless bottle without a label is water. Indian rum is often mixed with soda, e.g. Pepsi and sometimes Sprite, but in this case the second bottle is most likely water.
     
  8. Aug 16, 2010 #7

    George Jones

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    Re: rum

    I got my wife to watch, but she says the liquids are not specifically identified.

    Maybe the clear liquid is water. Water is not available 24 hours a day, so keeping a bottle of water beside a bottle of booze makes sense.
     
  9. Aug 16, 2010 #8
    Re: rum

    Hamster, you are right but it's not Pepsi or Coke.

    George, it could be water but water is not served in the type of bottle they've used.
     
  10. Aug 16, 2010 #9

    Danger

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    Re: rum

    I defer to Hamster's expertise in the matter. My 20 years of bartending was restricted to Canadian culture. Here, white rum is mixed with any kind of pop or fruit juice. Dark and amber types are usually mixed with only cola or juice; they don't really go well with 7-Up or ginger ale.
     
  11. Aug 16, 2010 #10

    George Jones

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    Re: rum

    I wondered about that, but, still, it seems like water to me.

    My wife couldn't pull herself away, and finally exclaimed "What have you got me watching!"
     
  12. Aug 16, 2010 #11
    Re: rum

    Both rum and whisky are spirits. Which one is more strong?

    Is this true that spirits can cause more damage to the body than alcoholic beverages, such as wine, with lower alcohol content?

    Thanks for the help.
     
  13. Aug 16, 2010 #12

    cronxeh

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    Re: rum

    The one with higher proof is stronger. Something with more alcohol by volume (ABV) will cause more damage to your kidneys. Wine usually has 12-15%, and spirits are by definition over 20%. Some whiskey/rum from cask can have 60% ABV.

    Edit: Generally for a healthy male 21-30 I would say if you drink on any single occasion less than 40 grams of ethanol you should be 'OK' provided you don't have any other conditions. The way to calculate this is rather simple: Say you are drinking 100 mL of vodka (40% ABV). That means you have 40 mL of ethanol in there. Ethanol's density is 0.79 grams/mL. 40*0.79=31.6 grams. So you should be safe.

    Cirrhosis of the liver can develop if you drink more than 80 grams/day for over 10 years. So if you consume over 250 cc of Vodka a day, or over 800 cc of wine a day, or over 2 liters of beer a day, then you have a chance of developing cirrhosis.

    This is an excerpt from the bible of medicine (for me), the Merck Manual:
    But keep in mind, long before you develop the cirrhosis of the liver, your kidneys will fail and your brain will melt from the Korsakoff's psychosis. Muahahha
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2010
  14. Aug 16, 2010 #13

    Danger

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    Re: rum

    The strength (ie: alcohol content) depends upon the manufacturing process. Again, I can speak only for Canadian stuff. All normal liquors such as rums, vodkas, whiskeys, etc. are 40% alcohol by volume. Special versions can go much higher, such as Appleton's rum at 120-proof (60%) or Everclear at 190-proof.
    Medical opinions change almost daily as regard health benefits and hazards. By the way, standard commercial servings (as in a bar) of wine, beer, and liquor have the same alcohol content. Liquor is served in 1-ounce increments, wine in 4-ounce glasses, and beer in 12-ounce cans or bottles.

    edit: I see that Cronxeh sneaked in ahead of me.
     
  15. Aug 16, 2010 #14

    Evo

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    Re: rum

    Bacardi Rum has a 151 proof rum (75.5%), which is really for flambaying, not so much for drinking. But people drink it.
     
  16. Aug 16, 2010 #15

    cronxeh

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    Re: rum

    Can I do a belly button shot of that from you? :biggrin:
     
  17. Aug 16, 2010 #16
    Re: rum

    Hi Dan

    Sorry, I couldn't get it. ABV or alcohol content is one of the main differences between them.

     
  18. Aug 16, 2010 #17
    Re: rum

    I ran out of Captain Morgan's once (black label, for those who judge) so I decided to mix my rum and coke with some Bacardi 151 we had lying around for Flaming Dr Peppers. That was a bad idea.
     
  19. Aug 16, 2010 #18
    Re: rum

    I have had non-alcoholic malted drinks several times. They taste so bad and bitter. This is one of the main reasons that I've never inclined myself into tasting fermented drinks. AND this has always left me wondering what is so special about fermented malted drinks. Does fermentation really change the 'badness' and 'bitterness' into something palatable such as Coke, Sprite?
     
  20. Aug 17, 2010 #19
    Re: rum

    The bitterness does not go away. In fact, beer brewers usually add hops to their brew with intent to make it bitter, strong beer is supposed to be. It's just a different taste. Not like Coke/Sprite at all. One important difference is that beer is never sweet. Even a trace of sweetness (due to incomplete fermentation) can make it taste gross.
     
  21. Aug 17, 2010 #20

    Danger

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    Re: rum

    A lot of people add salt to their beer. It mellows out the flavour and also brings the "head" down immediately so you don't get foam all over your nose.
     
  22. Aug 18, 2010 #21
    Re: rum

    Which one of the alcoholic beverages (brand or type like beer, wine, spirit) is the most beneficial to health and has good taste?

    Pepsi and Coke have almost identical flavors though there are subtle differences. In case of alcohol some of the things which are responsible for the differences are: percentage of ethanol (beer and wine have different amount of ethanol), source of ethanol (like the grain used), procedure of production adopted (spirit or liquor is produced through distillation), containers used.

    What are other factors responsible for the differences? I think the containers such as casks used during production of alcohol can add to the flavor of the end product. Can the containers used alter the end product in some other way too?

    Please help me with these. Thanks.
     
  23. Aug 18, 2010 #22

    cronxeh

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    Re: rum

    Red wine supposedly contains resveratrol, so in addition to benefits for your cardiovascular system you also get the antioxidant benefit. Provided you don't drink more than a glass of red wine a day.

    Beer has the vitamins. But I dont think there are any benefits from spirits, so I dont drink them.
     
  24. Aug 18, 2010 #23
    Re: rum

    IIRC the origin of benefits to the cardio system has not been decisively proven. At least some studies show that people who drink moderate amounts of beer & spirits (under two drinks a day) have lower rates of cardiovascular diseases, just like those who drink red wine.

    Only the unfiltered beer contains vitamins.
     
  25. Aug 18, 2010 #24

    DaveC426913

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    Re: rum

    And because I'm a dolt, it took me until just now to figure out why the 7 year old rum I was sipping was much more mild and tolerable than the usual liquor store variety.

    The 7 year old stuff is only 80 proof.

    I knew all this, I just never connected the dots...
     
  26. Aug 19, 2010 #25

    Danger

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    Re: rum

    :frown: :bugeye: :frown: (Why don't we have a smiley for shaking one's head morosely?)
    One of these days, Dave, we're going to have to take you to the vet and have you put down for your own good.
     
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