Atom charge after ionizing (nuclei/particle) radiation

In summary, the overall electrical charge of an instable atom does change when it emits alpha or beta particles. In the case of alpha decay, the atom becomes an ion due to the loss of two protons. Similarly, in beta decay, the atom becomes a positive ion due to the formation of an extra proton. However, these processes occur at energies where the atomic electrons do not play a role, unlike in chemical reactions where electrons are emitted with lower energies.
  • #1
n124122
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Homework Statement


When an instable atom emits alpha or beta particles. Doesn't the overal electrical charge of the remaining atom change? For example when an atom emits alpha decay, a helium core is emitted, this results in the lose of two protons (forthe radiating atom). But doens't this mean the atom became an ion, because it has 2 elektrons 'to much' (more than protons). And when it emits beta radiation. It forms an extra proton, so doesn't this make the atom a positive ion? And when this happens, does the atom remain an ion or??

Homework Equations


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The Attempt at a Solution


I have no idea:wink:
 
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  • #2
n124122 said:
When an instable atom emits alpha or beta particles. Doesn't the overal electrical charge of the remaining atom change? For example when an atom emits alpha decay, a helium core is emitted, this results in the lose of two protons (forthe radiating atom). But doens't this mean the atom became an ion, because it has 2 elektrons 'to much' (more than protons). And when it emits beta radiation. It forms an extra proton, so doesn't this make the atom a positive ion? And when this happens, does the atom remain an ion or??

in alpha deacay the parent say 238U goes to thorium the daughter nucleus and an alpha particle -in this the charge and particle number conservation is obeyed. Thorium has 90 protons whereas U has 92 and the He has those two protons , the process is nuclear so no ionised Uranium is there.
Similarly in beta decay -as electron is not present in the nucleus in this process one neutron gets converted to proton and charge conservation is obeyed; as an example
40 K is a beta emitter(z-19) than the product is 40 Ca with Z value 20 and a beta particle i.e. electron.
the events are at energies where the atomic electrons/cheges do not have any role.( energies are of the order of MeV in nuclear reaction) whereas in atomic phenomena its of the order of eV or kev.
 
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  • #3
drvrm said:
in alpha deacay the parent say 238U goes to thorium the daughter nucleus and an alpha particle -in this the charge and particle number conservation is obeyed. Thorium has 90 protons whereas U has 92 and the He has those two protons , the process is nuclear so no ionised Uranium is there.
Similarly in beta decay -as electron is not present in the nucleus in this process one neutron gets converted to proton and charge conservation is obeyed; as an example
40 K is a beta emitter(z-19) than the product is 40 Ca with Z value 20 and a beta particle i.e. electron.
the events are at energies where the atomic electrons/cheges do not have any role.( energies are of the order of MeV in nuclear reaction) whereas in atomic phenomena its of the order of eV or kev.

So the elektrons are just emittes in a chemical reaction with low energies?
 

1. What is ionizing radiation?

Ionizing radiation is a type of energy that is emitted from radioactive materials or generated artificially. It has enough energy to remove electrons from atoms, creating positively charged ions.

2. How does ionizing radiation affect atoms?

Ionizing radiation can cause atoms to lose electrons, resulting in a change in their charge. This can lead to chemical reactions, DNA damage, and other biological effects.

3. What happens to the charge of an atom after it is exposed to ionizing radiation?

The charge of an atom can become more positive or negative, depending on the type of ionizing radiation and the specific atom. For example, if an atom loses an electron, it will have a positive charge, and if it gains an electron, it will have a negative charge.

4. How does the charge of an atom after ionizing radiation affect its chemical properties?

The change in charge can alter the chemical properties of an atom, making it more reactive or less stable. This can lead to the formation of new compounds or the breakdown of existing ones.

5. Can the charge of an atom be restored after exposure to ionizing radiation?

In some cases, the charge of an atom can be restored by gaining or losing electrons through chemical reactions. However, in other cases, the damage from ionizing radiation may be permanent.

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