Average Speed to and From a Place: Solved Equation

  • Thread starter Tyrion101
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In summary, the conversation discusses solving an equation with two possible solutions (s = 55 and s = -6) and confusion about what to do next. It also mentions the incorrect formatting of the equation and the possibility of negative speeds. The program is asking for the two speeds for a round trip and it is necessary to use parentheses when there are multiple fractions in the equation. The asker should plug in both solutions to see which one satisfies the equation and determine if 55 is a reasonable car speed.
  • #1
Tyrion101
166
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I've solved my equation, which was originally 240/s + 240/s+ 11 = 8 as, s = 55 and s = -6. It's asking for the average speed to and from a place.It asks me to use s and s+11 and s as my two speeds, but I've tried using 55 and -6 both, it solves all portions of the equation, but I'm lost as what to do next. The program doesn't say what to do next, it just says tell me the answer.
 
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  • #2
Tyrion101 said:
I've solved my equation, which was originally 240/s + 240/s+ 11 = 8 as, s = 55 and s = -6. It's asking for the average speed to and from a place.It asks me to use s and s+11 and s as my two speeds, but I've tried using 55 and -6 both, it solves all portions of the equation, but I'm lost as what to do next. The program doesn't say what to do next, it just says tell me the answer.
Is the program asking for the two speeds for the round trip? If so, 55 and -6 are NOT the answers. -6 is not a reasonable answer unless the car somehow made the trip in reverse. In any case, car speedometers don't register negative speeds.

Also, you've posted here long enough that you should realize by now that your equation is written incorrectly.
240/s + 240/s+ 11 = 8
This means ##\frac{240}{s} + \frac{240}{s} + 11 = 8##

If the second fraction has s + 11 in the denominator, use parentheses to indicate that.

Also, do not just discard the homework template. Fair warning...
 
  • #3
homework template?
 
  • #4
When you start a thread in the homework section, it automatically contains a three part template. Possibly it doesn't if you have the PF app on a phone.
 
  • #5
No, I was using taptalk, sorry, the next time I'll post using that instead. But anyway, back to the question, I've plugged both answers into the first equation, and get 8 when I plug in both numbers as possible answers, I realize that -6 is not a car speed, but sometimes in the homework, one answer won't work, but the other will satisfy, 55 should be a reasonable car speed, as could 66, depending on where this person lives, and what roads they were driving on. Is it asking me to if 55 were s, then add 11 to it and get both speeds?
 
  • #6
Yes, I believe so. The form seems to be asking for s and s+11, the two speeds.
 

What is the equation for calculating average speed to and from a place?

The equation for calculating average speed to and from a place is: Average Speed = Total Distance / Total Time Taken.

How do you find the total distance traveled?

The total distance traveled can be found by adding the distance traveled to the place and the distance traveled back from the place.

What units should be used for the distance and time in the equation?

The distance should be measured in units of length, such as meters or miles, and the time should be measured in units of time, such as seconds or hours. It is important to use consistent units for accurate calculation.

What is the difference between average speed and instantaneous speed?

Average speed is the total distance traveled divided by the total time taken, while instantaneous speed is the speed at a specific moment in time. Average speed gives an overall picture of the speed during the entire trip, while instantaneous speed gives information about the speed at a particular point.

Can the average speed to and from a place be different?

Yes, the average speed to and from a place can be different if the distance or time taken in one direction is different from the other. For example, if there is heavy traffic on the way back from a place, the time taken may be longer and therefore the average speed will be slower compared to the average speed going to the place.

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