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News Becoming a Capitalist President in El Salvador. Some advices?

  1. Aug 15, 2010 #1
    My country is still poor and it has a lot of social problems.

    This are

    -Extreme Violence.
    -Poverty.
    -Ignorance.
    -And a lot of leftist that admire Fidel Castro and totalitarism.
    -Pollutio.

    We dont have to much resources , but we have people who love to work.

    Some solutions:

    -Open the country to foreign inverstion
    -Deregulate the economy
    -Privatize Important sectors
    -Make the goverment more transparent so there be more trust in iverstion.

    Things Im not sure:

    -In capitalism education and healthcare are private, but in my country they are socialized in a big part. It would be smart to privatize this? Does private healthcare really works and improves quality? Full private education would be better? What happend if people cant pay?

    -Enviromental regulation is good? Does is it have a place in capitalism?


    Notes:

    -Would be good to become the Honk Kong of Latin America(they are ranked 1 in economic freedom) but even they have some state owned in education and healthcare?

    Please some adivices =).
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 15, 2010 #2
    The solutions you presented are not close to the reality, and capitalism wouldn't solve those problems.
     
  4. Aug 16, 2010 #3

    fluidistic

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    Before Sarkozy, France's education (even university) was free. Healthcare system was free (to many) and many important corporations were public (trains, phone, mail, gaz, etc.). The country wasn't so bad to live in. I'm pretty sure that many mostly socialist countries are doing great in terms of quality of life.
    I don't know El Salvador. But I'm guessing that eradicating corruption should be a priority (so change the Government entirely), reforming the education (I'm guessing that pupils are brainwashed early in their life, even by their parents) and spending better the money of the people (who is likely stolen by the Government) should do an improvement in the quality of life of El Salvador's people.
    The problem is that I'm not sure about the chances of this to happen. Probably very, very low unfortunately.
     
  5. Aug 16, 2010 #4

    mheslep

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    Maybe, if one could get a job there.
    00|2001|2002|2003|2004|2005|2006|2007|2008|2009|1:&chxp=&chxr=1,0.00,11.00&chxs=&chg=11.11111,10.png

    Oh, and nothing is free.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2010
  6. Aug 16, 2010 #5

    CRGreathouse

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    Hey now. France may have an unemployment rate worse than Nicaragua, Bulgaria, and the Central African Republic, but at least it's improving.
     
  7. Aug 16, 2010 #6

    mheslep

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    Yep, especially since Sarkozy came in.
     
  8. Aug 16, 2010 #7
    That is your answer to where people feel good to live ? Are there not dedicated studies to this specific question ?

    Your view is biased, your argument is misplaced and unnecessary in this context. Why point out to negative points instead of admitting positive ones ? In particular, you can not brush out the fact that education and healthcare are crazily expensive in the US. Those are deep structural problems.
     
  9. Aug 16, 2010 #8

    fluidistic

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    Irrelevant in the discussion. According to your chart, the unemployment before Sarkozy came in was below 9% and now it's below 8%. What an improvement within 3 years you may think? What we should look at isn't this data but rather the HDI which is more representative of the quality of life of people in a country in my opinion. It has probably increased of course, but my point still holds, when France had a socialist prime minister, it wasn't doing that bad. In fact I'm pretty sure that people that didn't have a job and were subscribed to the chomage when Jospin was prime minister had a better quality of life than many working people in El Salvador today. My point was that socialist countries can "do well" in the sense that people's quality of life is high compared to the average. Eradicating socialism from El Salvador isn't the way to go. By the way your chart doesn't show who took the data. I'm guessing that it's the INSEE (public institute) but it wasn't working for months (maybe more than 1 year? Because Sarkozy wanted to eradicate it) back in 2008/2009 so where your data comes from during those times? Private institutes... how reliable are they? Anyway it's not relevant to the thread anyway.

    Also by saying nothing is free, you're partially right since it's working people that pay the whole public system which is available for most of French population. A "poor" in France could go to University without having great financial problems, it was possible for poors to go to University if they really wanted to (I guess you'll come in with a stat of people's going to University and their income, but I don't care, a poor could still go to University regardless of their number). Now it's very different, one has to pay to go to University, "thanks" to Sarkozy.
     
  10. Aug 16, 2010 #9

    CRGreathouse

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    I love the idea of the HDI. I think it would be hard to do a worse job in creating such an index, though, unless one was trying to do poorly. What a lost opportunity.
     
  11. Aug 16, 2010 #10

    russ_watters

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    We've been over this before: your beliefs about how capitalist countries work are unconnected with reality. You need to read about and learn how they actually work.
     
  12. Aug 16, 2010 #11

    fluidistic

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    I don't understand English enough to realize whether you imply that it's a bad or good index. I think it's still better than the unemployment rate. If you look at Argentina's unemployment rate (around 9% I think), you'd think that the country is doing as well as France. Wrong, around 40% of workers work in the black market. The HDI would be a better index, though it doesn't work well for a few countries like Argentina and Chile.
     
  13. Aug 16, 2010 #12
    About "bad indices", to my mind it is rather much worse than "a compound index is better than a single one". Any index, be it compound, is necessarily partial and thus will be criticized.

    For instance, you could read people on this board claiming that when socialist party took over in France, unemployment raised. In fact, one could answer simply by reminding of the best method from right wing politics in France : they often cut down the unemployment rate by just stripping people from the unemployment benefit.
     
  14. Aug 16, 2010 #13
    I don't know how countries like that make improvements and how one can determine the likelihood of a country would overcome its barres other than that it would get a powerful leader or get invaded be foreign power. Some like BRIC have made significant improvements during last decades. *(I will try to look for some information when I reach home).
     
  15. Aug 16, 2010 #14

    fluidistic

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    You're right.
    Here is a list of the index of corruption in countries:http://www.transparency.org/policy_research/surveys_indices/cpi/2009/cpi_2009_table.
    El Salvador appears to be 84/180 which isn't good but could be worse. As I said in post #3, corruption should be taken very seriously. My solution would be to change the president and ministers so that the new ones make the laws to be respected by uncorrupting the police. If the police is used not to respect the laws, then it's very hard to make any progress. This is what happens here in Argentina (though the country is corrupted at all levels. So much that it's badly affecting people's quality of life) and I guess also in El Salvador.
     
  16. Aug 16, 2010 #15
    Thanks for the posts.

    Some information:

    -El Salvador is Ranked in place 32 in economic freedom. Place of information: http://www.heritage.org/Index/Country/ElSalvador

    --El Salvador is not a socialist country, the last 20 years a right wing neoliberalist party was in power(Wich i am goin to join)

    Note: Last time my thread was closed becouse of not saying were the information came from.

    -Chile is ranked 10 in economic freedom. Info: http://www.heritage.org/Index/Country/Chile .

    --Chile is the best country in Latin America, good economy and good HDI.

    Maybe we have to make 1st in economic freedom, and fight corruption as many of you have say.
     
  17. Aug 16, 2010 #16
    Give some ligth please =)
     
  18. Aug 16, 2010 #17

    CRGreathouse

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    I was saying that it was a bad index. Badly-designed, I mean.

    Agreed. But the unemployment rate doesn't bill itself as a general development index like the HDI.

    If you have a sledgehammer and a claw hammer, and the claw hammer is marketed as a screwdriver, then I'd say that the claw hammer is a bad screwdriver, even if it's a better screwdriver than the sledgehammer.
     
  19. Aug 16, 2010 #18

    CRGreathouse

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    Aside: Is that how the unemployment rate is calculated in France/the EU? Really? I thought economic technology was more advanced than that...
     
  20. Aug 17, 2010 #19
    In my understanding it is the same measurement in the US. The difference with employment-to-population ratio is known, and monitored. It is all available
    http://www.bls.gov/webapps/legacy/cpsatab1.htm
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 25, 2017
  21. Aug 17, 2010 #20

    Pythagorean

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    Depends on how you define "free". If I have an electric car and I only plug it in at my workplace, then transportation is free for me : )
     
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