Beginning physics degree 6 years after HS studies....tips?

In summary: Just wanted to make sure I was doing the right thing before investing too much time/money.In summary, it's possible to start studying physics again after a long break, and self-taught approaches may be less thorough than ALEKS courses.
  • #1
Newtons Blue Dog
6
1
Hey guys so I'm enrolled to start a physics major this coming semester but have been out of school since 2009 (im 24 now) and haven't done much if any related math or physics study since. Had always been quite good at maths and physics in high school but worried that i will have forgotten a lot of what i have learned. Anyone else with similar experiences or studying again after a long break? Or just tips on what to expect from a physics major in general?
 
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  • #2
And yes first post
 
  • #3
I started being a physics major after not taking any math or physics courses for a solid 10 years. I occasionally helped people at my place of employment with their physics and math but I'd always be pretty rusty and I'd have to read the book before I could offer any help (I like you was a good math and physics student in HS).

Well, it's been 3 years since I started again and I just got my first answer for admission to a graduate school, I was accepted!

So, it is possible. You may feel really rusty or like you made a mistake at first. I remember my first class in Calculus II, the professor did an integral using Weirstrauss substitution. I was TOTALLY floored and felt so inadequate. I quickly learned that everyone else did too, after putting in some hard work I ended up earning a 4.0 at the community college, then going to a state college and earning a 3.83 there.

If you want it bad enough, you can have it Newtons Blue Dog. Just make sure you want it! Because it can be pretty hard at times!
 
  • #4
Completing an ALEKS pre-calc course would knock the rust off your math skills thoroughly. Self-taught approaches tend to be less thorough.
 
  • #5
Thanks for the advice guys, yeah was considering some of the online math and physics course.
 

Related to Beginning physics degree 6 years after HS studies....tips?

1. How difficult will it be to catch up on the required coursework after 6 years away from physics?

The difficulty of catching up on coursework will depend on the individual's previous knowledge and experience with physics. It may take some time and effort to refresh your understanding of basic concepts and catch up on any new developments in the field, but with dedication and hard work, it is definitely achievable.

2. Will my high school physics classes still be relevant to my degree after such a long break?

While some basic concepts from high school physics may still be applicable, it is likely that there have been advancements and changes in the field since then. It is important to keep an open mind and be willing to learn new things, as your high school knowledge may not be enough to fully grasp the material in your degree program.

3. Are there any specific resources or study tips that can help me succeed in my physics degree after a long break?

Yes, there are many resources available to help you succeed in your physics degree. It is important to consult with your professors and academic advisors for guidance, and also take advantage of study groups, tutoring services, and online resources to supplement your learning. Additionally, it is important to stay organized, manage your time effectively, and stay motivated and focused on your goals.

4. Will my age be a disadvantage in pursuing a physics degree after a long break?

No, your age should not be a disadvantage in pursuing a physics degree. In fact, your life experiences and maturity may even be an advantage in understanding complex concepts and problem-solving. It is never too late to pursue your passion and further your education.

5. Are there any career opportunities for someone with a physics degree after a long break from studies?

Yes, there are many career opportunities for individuals with a physics degree. Physics is a versatile field, with applications in industries such as research, engineering, healthcare, technology, and more. Your degree will also provide you with transferable skills such as critical thinking, problem-solving, and analytical skills, which are highly sought after in various professions.

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