Being ready for Classical Physics

In summary, the conversation is about the speaker's concern about their readiness for classical physics due to not having taken high school physics. They are taking an introductory physical science course at their community college, but are disappointed to find that it also includes basic chemistry. The speaker is worried about not being prepared for classical physics and is unsure about what else they can do to prepare. The expert suggests that the speaker focus on their Calculus courses and continue to work on their Algebra, Trigonometry, and Calculus skills, as these are important for studying fundamental Physics courses.
  • #1
Kalzar89
8
0
Hello,

My math is good enough for Classical physics however, I believe my physics is not. I did not take high school physics which I regret but now I must catch up and take this class at my community college that is supposed to get me caught up. I am more than happy to take it because physics is really interesting to me. They called it physical science and its course description is something like this:

Intro to Physical Science, 4 cr.
A survey of the basic concepts of astronomy and physics, recommended for students who have not had high school physics. Lecture, demonstration and laboratory.

But now that I am in the class the teacher is telling us how the class is split in half with one half being physics and astronmy and the other half being chemistry which is very dissapointing to me becuase its even more basic chemistry than my high school chemistry course.

I really want to be prepared for classical physics and this is the only course my community college offers. The physics chapters include

2. Motion
3. Energy
4. Heat and Temperature
5. Wave Motions and Sound
6. Electricity
7. Light

and the astronmy chapters are:

14. The universe
15. The solar system
16 Earth in Space

Here is the book we use btw: https://www.amazon.com/dp/0077263138/?tag=pfamazon01-20

The chemistry is inbetween the physics chapters and astronmy chapters. After going through chapter 2 on motion this stuff if pretty much cake and I just feel I am not going to be ready for classical physics if this is the only class they have to offer for preparation.
And to make matters worse the teacher is cut out the last two chapters of the physics section which are electricity and light which is insane considering this is supposed to be a class recommended for students who have not had high school physics yet.

Here is the course description of Classical physics I and II at my school

Classical Physics I, 5 cr.
Demonstrations, lectures recitations and laboratory work beginning a two-semester sequence covering the subject. Mechanics is primarily covered in the first semester. Recommended for those planning to major in engineering, physics, chemistry and mathematics. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment or previous course in calculus.

Classical Physics II, 5 cr.
Continuation of PHY-222. Thermodynamics and electricity and magnetism are covered in this course. Lecture and laboratory

Other classes I will be taking along with this are Calculus I and II which is a given and General Chemistry I and II.

Should I be worried about my situation or is this physical science class actually supposed to be this easy? I need to know if I will be ready for classical physics, could anyone tell me what more I can do to make sure I am ready?
 
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  • #2
What you really need are the Calculus courses, which you have already started. The first half of the Physics introductory course seems like a good way to help you and it may be very demanding but not really difficult. So far you are preparing well enough.

You really need to concentrate on concepts and skills of Algebra, Trigonometry, and Calculus, because when you study the fundamental Physics courses (university level, lower division), you will rely on that Mathematics.
 
  • #3




It is understandable that you may feel unprepared for classical physics due to not having taken high school physics. However, it is great that you are motivated to catch up and are taking a physical science course at your community college. It is important to remember that everyone learns at their own pace and it is never too late to learn something new.

The course you are currently taking may seem easy to you because it is a basic level course designed for students who have not taken high school physics. However, it is still important to fully understand the concepts and principles being taught in this course as they will serve as the foundation for your future physics courses.

To ensure that you are ready for classical physics, it would be helpful to supplement your learning with additional resources such as online lectures, practice problems, and textbooks. You can also reach out to your professor for extra help or clarification on any topics that you find challenging. Additionally, taking calculus courses alongside your physics course will also help you better understand the mathematical concepts involved in classical physics.

Overall, it is important to stay motivated and dedicated to your studies and seek out additional resources to supplement your learning. With hard work and determination, you can definitely be successful in classical physics. Best of luck to you!
 

Related to Being ready for Classical Physics

1. What is Classical Physics?

Classical Physics is a branch of physics that studies the behavior of macroscopic objects at speeds much slower than the speed of light. It is based on Newton's laws of motion and describes the behavior of objects in everyday life.

2. What are the basic principles of Classical Physics?

The basic principles of Classical Physics include the laws of motion, conservation of energy and momentum, and the theory of gravity. These principles govern the behavior of macroscopic objects and are the foundation of Classical Physics.

3. How do I prepare for studying Classical Physics?

To be ready for Classical Physics, it is important to have a strong understanding of basic mathematics, including algebra, trigonometry, and calculus. You should also have a basic understanding of scientific notation, units of measurement, and scientific notation.

4. What are some common applications of Classical Physics?

Classical Physics has many practical applications, including understanding the motion of objects, predicting the behavior of fluids, and designing structures to withstand forces. It is also the basis for many engineering and technological advancements, such as bridges, airplanes, and cars.

5. Can I study Classical Physics without a strong background in math?

While a strong background in math is recommended for studying Classical Physics, it is possible to learn the concepts with dedication and practice. However, it may be more challenging without a solid understanding of basic mathematical principles.

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