Better than Bell: The GHZM Effect

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In summary, the conversation discusses useful and thought-provoking links related to Bell's Inequality and the difference between Classical Mechanics and Quantum Mechanics. These include a Sidney Coleman lecture and a paper by Greenberger, Horne, Zeilinger, and Mermin. The talk is described as mind-blowing.
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I wanted to point out some links I found hugely useful and mind expanding. Apologies if this has been posted before (I did search for GHZM).

I've always found my eyes glazing over when trying to follow the derivation of Bell's Inequality, so I was very impressed when I saw this Sidney Coleman lecture.

http://media.physics.harvard.edu/video/index.php?id=SidneyColeman_QMIYF.flv

He describes an experimental arrangement that greatly simplifies the situation and makes the difference between Classical Mechanics and Quantum Mechanics as stark as possible. This is based on the work of Greenberger, Horne and Zeilinger with further simplication by Mermin in this paper (PDF):

http://www.physics.princeton.edu/~mcdonald/examples/QM/mermin_ajp_58_731_90.pdf

Sidney's explanation is a bit quick, so I didn't really get it until reading the paper and then going back to the video.

The rest of Coleman's talk is mindblowing as well.
 
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Related to Better than Bell: The GHZM Effect

1. What is the GHZM Effect?

The GHZM Effect, named after its discoverers Greenberger, Horne, Shimony, and Zeilinger, refers to the phenomenon observed in quantum entangled particles where their measurements are correlated in a way that cannot be explained by classical physics.

2. How does the GHZM Effect differ from Bell's theorem?

The GHZM Effect and Bell's theorem both deal with the concept of quantum entanglement, but they differ in their assumptions and conclusions. Bell's theorem states that local hidden variables cannot explain the correlations observed in entangled particles, while the GHZM Effect focuses on the specific scenario where three or more particles are entangled.

3. What are the practical applications of the GHZM Effect?

The GHZM Effect has potential applications in quantum cryptography and quantum computing. It can also be used to test the validity of quantum mechanics and challenge our understanding of the nature of reality.

4. How was the GHZM Effect first observed?

The GHZM Effect was first observed in 1990 by Greenberger, Horne, Shimony, and Zeilinger in a series of experiments involving entangled photons. They showed that the correlations between measurements of the entangled photons could not be explained by any local hidden variables theory.

5. What are the implications of the GHZM Effect for quantum mechanics?

The GHZM Effect is a significant discovery in quantum mechanics as it challenges the traditional understanding of the relationship between particles and the concept of reality. It suggests that the properties of entangled particles are not separate but rather interconnected, even when they are physically separated. This has led to further investigations into the nature of quantum mechanics and our understanding of the universe.

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