Biochemical reason behind (neurotic) perfectionism

In summary, there is a link between neurotic perfectionism and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). However, the underlying mechanism and connection between the two is not completely understood. The DSM-V defines perfectionism as an aspect of OCD, but there is also a separate disorder called Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder (OCPD) which is often comorbid with OCD. The cause of both disorders is still unknown, but research suggests a potential connection to biochemical differences in the brain.
  • #1
Tyto alba
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Is the reason behind neurotic perfectionism known? I'm looking for the molecular basis of this kind of perfectionism but couldn't find much on Google - Web and Scholar.
 
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  • #2
Try googling to OCD - obsessive-compulsive disorder. And I do not know if there is any really complete biochemical explanation. NIMH is where you want to go for any known answers.

Google NIMH: OCD biochemistry and you get lots of hits. All with valid information.
Here is one:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17679639

I get the idea that you are really trying to answer some other question, not the one you stated.
 
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  • #3
No, I'm trying to find an answer to the question I stated.

Does a case of (neurotic) perfectionism necessarily have to be one of OCD?
 
  • #4
The DSM-V defines perfectionism as an aspect of obsessive-compulsive disorder. Whilst the DSM is obviously subject to change it represents that the current consensus is that the two are related.
http://www.psi.uba.ar/academica/carrerasdegrado/psicologia/sitios_catedras/practicas_profesionales/820_clinica_tr_personalidad_psicosis/material/dsm.pdf

As with most mental health disorders the underlying mechanism is not completely understood, especially at a biochemical level. The paper suggested by Jim is a good start for you as it looks into some of the physiological differences within the brains of OCD patients.
 
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  • #5
"Neurotic perfectionism," as phrased, would actually be a manifestation of Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder, which is a disorder distinct from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obsessive–compulsive_personality_disorder

Confusion arises because of the similar names and because many with one disorder also have the other: they are often comorbid.

OCPD is often confused with obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD). Despite the similar names, they are two distinct disorders—OCD is an anxiety disorder and OCPD is a personality disorder. Some OCPD individuals do have OCD, and the two are sometimes found in the same family,[14] sometimes along with eating disorders.[15] People with OCPD do not generally feel the need to repeatedly perform ritualistic actions—a common symptom of OCD—and usually find pleasure in perfecting a task, whereas people with OCD are often more distressed after their actions...

That said, the cause of both is still unknown.
 
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Related to Biochemical reason behind (neurotic) perfectionism

1. What is the biochemical basis of perfectionism?

Perfectionism is believed to be influenced by several biochemical factors, including neurotransmitters like serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine. These neurotransmitters play a role in regulating mood, behavior, and motivation, which can impact an individual's tendency towards perfectionism.

2. How does neurotic perfectionism differ from other types of perfectionism?

Neurotic perfectionism, also known as maladaptive perfectionism, is characterized by an intense fear of failure, self-doubt, and self-criticism. This type of perfectionism is associated with higher levels of stress and anxiety, and can also be influenced by genetic and environmental factors.

3. Can perfectionism be considered a mental disorder?

While perfectionism itself is not considered a mental disorder, it can be a contributing factor to conditions such as anxiety, depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. It is important to seek professional help if perfectionism is causing significant distress or interfering with daily functioning.

4. Are there any genetic factors involved in perfectionism?

Studies have shown that there may be a genetic component to perfectionism, as it has been found to run in families. However, environmental factors, such as family upbringing and societal pressures, also play a significant role in the development of perfectionism.

5. Can biochemical interventions be used to treat perfectionism?

While there is no specific medication for treating perfectionism, some individuals may benefit from antidepressants or anti-anxiety medications to manage the symptoms associated with perfectionism. However, therapy and cognitive-behavioral techniques are often the most effective in addressing the root causes of perfectionism.

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