Black holes, a simple theory, has it been looked into

  • Thread starter burgerdave
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  • #1

Main Question or Discussion Point

Here it is, its probably an old one but as im not a fully fledged scientist I dont know if it is. It relys on paralel universes. So what if the black hole sits over a valve beetween the sheets of these universes sucking in matter and compressing it through the valve into the paralel universe where a star sits over it spewing out this superheated superconcentrated matter. Interesting thought eh.

When the black hole collapses, the star dies out and the process is reversed as the star collapses into itself to create a black hole on the other side of the valve a star is born.

What do you think?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Oh dear, I think I missed something important that might cause a problem.

Gravity!!

Where does the pull come from?
 
  • #3
Although could matter run like water, ie. you pull out the plug and matter runs down the hole and the difference beetween gravitational fields in the two universes could decide the direction of travel.

Maybie?

Ideas?
 
  • #4
Nabeshin
Science Advisor
2,205
16
Hi burgerdave and welcome to PF!

The notion of black holes as bridges to other universes is quite old and mathematically well founded. In the mathematical solution for a black hole, it is quite simple to use a set of coordinates which shows two asymptotically flat universes with a black hole between them. In this simple situation, nothing can pass through the hole to the other side, however. Unfortunately, popular science and science fiction seems to have ran with this concept a lot more than is necessary. The concept of a white hole, which is a product of this same coordinate choice, also seems to garner a lot of attention. Unfortunately, the truth of these objects is that they're entirely mathematical. They exist in a universe that has been around forever containing only the black hole which has been around forever. This simply is not our universe.

At this point I'd like to point out that personal theories are against the forum rules here. It's our goal to try and educate people as to the current state of science and, when appropriate, where current research and the cutting edge is.

With that in mind, in case you were wondering why your musings do not make any sense, there are several reasons. For one, stars simply are not born in this manner. Stars are born when a cloud of interstellar gas collapses in on itself enough to begin nuclear fusion -- they do not mysteriously pop in from the vacuum. Also if you're interested in black holes and other strange astrophysical phenomenon, I would advise you to drop your egregious use of analogies. The world simply does not behave as common sense would dictate, so trying to equate matter to water and black holes to valves is going to lead to more confusion than anything else.

(Note: We do use analogies to explain some mathematical concepts, for example the balloon analogy of the universe or the bowling ball on a rubber sheet model of general relativity. While these are helpful learning tools, I always stress that they are nothing more than analogies -- not the theory itself! It's always good to keep that in mind)

If you have any other questions regarding this I'd be happy to try to answer, but just remember the 2nd paragraph. :smile:

Cheers
 
  • #5
6,814
12
So what if the black hole sits over a valve beetween the sheets of these universes sucking in matter and compressing it through the valve into the paralel universe where a star sits over it spewing out this superheated superconcentrated matter. Interesting thought eh.
Yes. It's easy to come up with different ideas about how black holes work. The hard part is showing that an idea is wrong, and the big, big problem with your idea is that there isn't an obvious and simple way of proving it wrong. This is part of a bigger problem that we don't have a good model for the center of a black hole, so that you can make up anything. Being able to make up anything is considered bad.

When the black hole collapses, the star dies out and the process is reversed as the star collapses into itself to create a black hole on the other side of the valve a star is born.
That's clearly not happening on our universe. We can see stars being born, and those are clouds of gas collapsing.

Now you could argue that the matter is going into some other universe with different rules and different stars. Maybe, but then you run into the big problem of "proving that wrong."
 
  • #6
2,257
7
look up 'white hole'
 
  • #7
Chronos
Science Advisor
Gold Member
11,408
738
Until we find something that resembles a 'white hole' in this universe, this hypothesis has a 'black' future.
 
  • #8
Thanks, that clears a few things up for me, and your right about the analogys it is a bit much.
 

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