What is the Connection Between Black Holes and the Big Bang?

  • #1
jurap
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TL;DR Summary
Black holes, white holes, big bang.
I think Im onto something. I am sure I am not tho. Please prove me wrong.
*********Disclaimer********
Hi, I want to ask this community about some black hole shinanigans. I've spent some time searching for this topic here because I don't want to be the guy who spams a forum with a question already answered a hundred times over. Since none of the threads I found answered my question exactly, I want to try asking directly. Still, my fascination for space and physics is purely a hobby. I do not study or work in this field so if this is a common topic, I am sorry.
****************************

Here is my thought process.
Say a particle A falls into a black hole. As it approaches the singularity (S for short), time dilation increases exponentially. It's time "slows" for the rest of us.
Particle B falls in after it. Its time dilates as well but as it is further from the S than particle A at each instance, it is moving toward S faster than A.

So, from A's perspective, all the matter that fell after it starts catching up. It can never take over, but as A gets infinitely close to S, B (and everything that fell after) catches up infinitely close to A (and everything that fell before).

Therefore, it seems to me you can say that ALL matter that entered a black hole reaches the singularity at the same time...

Now, I am still trying to warp my mind around it, especially the part where the black hole is formed (does the imploded star actually form the singularity or is singularity an infinitely tiny pocket of emptiness surrounded by particles of enormous mass infinitely-slowly getting ever so closer?)

BUT it seems to me that if this is true, a black hole is essentially a time capsule for all the matter that fell in waiting till the end of time when all that trapped matter reaches the singularity at a single point in time. And that sounds a lot like the single-point-single-instance origin of the big bang.
Which is why I think a white hole isn't some end of a tunnel slowly shooting out particles from the black hole one at a time. It is an infinitely fast and powerful explosion releasing the core of and ancient black hole. Perhaps from a previous universe.

Thank you for reading. If you see the error of my logic, please point it out so I can take my science theories back to sci-fi :D
 
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  • #2
jurap said:
BUT it seems to me that if this is true….
It’s not.
You’ve picked up several popular misunderstandings here, but actually
- the Big Bang happened everywhere, not happen at a point
- despite the external appearance of slowing time, things falling into a black hole reach the event horizon very quickly
- the singularity at the “center” of a black hole is a point in time, not a place in space

We have many threads discussing this stuff, and you may want to go through them (and @PeterDonis’s Insights articles on the Schwarzschild geometry).

As it is based on misunderstandings this thread is closed.
 
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  • #3
jurap said:
Therefore, it seems to me you can say that ALL matter that entered a black hole reaches the singularity at the same time...
Well, your reasoning was wrong, because everything you described about the singularity was actually a statement about the event horizon in the Schwarzschild coordinates. But the conclusion is correct for the simple reason that the singularity is a moment in time, or a moment when time ends.

jurap said:
And that sounds a lot like the single-point-single-instance origin of the big bang.
One major difference is that a white hole is a vacuum solution and the Big Bang is not a vacuum solution. Another major difference is that a white hole is isotropic but not homogenous while the Big Bang is both isotropic and homogenous.
 
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