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BS or MS in EE after physics BS?

  1. Dec 29, 2015 #1
    Hey,

    I will be graduating soon with a BS in Physics but have recently developed a interest to pursue a career in the EE field. I was planning to just head to a Masters program in EE, but the more I read up I am realizing that there is a difference in having a BS in EE and MS in EE. Im reading that the BS is a stronger degree than the MS, so should I suck it up and head back to get my BS in EE or should I continue towards a Masters. Which one do companies prefer? and is there a difference in years I will be spending in school between the two?
     
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  3. Dec 30, 2015 #2

    CalcNerd

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    In truth, you probably can't get into an MSEE program, unless your BS in Physics is loaded up with a good portion of EE classes or shared EE/Physics classes. While Electromag / fields may be shared, most others are not. What is your background in circuit design or power? EE is a broad field too.
    .
    You might not need a BS in EE to get into an MSEE, but you will likely need to take another year of college or find some way to get a minor in EE to have a chance to get an MSEE.
    .
    As for employability, usually an MSEE will be more sought after, but employers also want experience with knowledge and at a salary they can afford. So a BS in EE out of school will be a better investment to most companies than an MSEE (with NO experience). Anyone interested in you, would be for research purposes and now you are back to square one, why not get your MS in Physics? You can concentrate on EE type coursework with a physics slant.
    .
    Just my 2 cents.
     
  4. Dec 30, 2015 #3
    I have emailed few graduate EE programs in regards

    I emailed a few graduate programs about me being a physics major and most told me I should be fine and i would just be taking a few undergrad EE courses to catch up. So I dont think getting into a MS program is the issue. As for my field of interest its in Power Systems.

    Getting a MS in physics with a concentration in EE seems like its much less employable than an EE degree.
     
  5. Dec 30, 2015 #4

    Student100

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    Any degree in the natural sciences is much less employable than a degree in engineering. That said, the only reason I could see that you'd want to go back and get an EE bachelors is to help with obtaining a PE license, this probably isn't very important for EE's.

    If you already know what you'd want to study for your MS in engineering, then you should be able to take enough classes as electives/non degree student/self study to be adequately prepared. I've never done an MS for engineering, but the people I know that have say a MS is very specialized in one area of EE, so if you have the background in this area you should be fine.

    What'll be lacking is the breadth of study that bachelors in the field would provide. Will you be accepted into a program as easily as an EE major? Probably not. Will you get a job as easily? Probably not. Is it impossible to do either? Probably not.

    You'll also be paying for your MS, unlike physics were most students can secure funding, engineering isn't going to work the same way. This also helps with getting accepted into a program, and you would probably be able to take catch up classes on your own dime.
     
  6. Dec 30, 2015 #5

    Vanadium 50

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    I think I have to differ with the "much".Carnevale et al. "College Majors, Employment and Earnings" (2012) lists unemployment rates for recent college graduates at 7.7% for the life and physical sciences and 7.5% for engineering. (And for graduate degree holders, the trend reverses, to 2.2% and 3.4%) Earnings are another story - recent college grads in the life and physical sciences start at $32K vs $55K for engineers. (However, physics seems to be an exception - they do not report the recent college graduate salary, but salaries for experienced college grads is $81K, the same as the engineering average)
     
  7. Dec 30, 2015 #6
    Student100 my main concern is if I were to get into a MSEE program and graduate will i be at a less advantage than a person with a Bachelors? And wouldn't most MSEE programs be able to provide internship ooportunities to help gain experience?
     
  8. Dec 30, 2015 #7

    Student100

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    Interesting, I didn't know that.

    I had read something from a less accurate source (news article) a few years ago that had it in the ~20% range for natural science majors, versus ~11% for engineering. It may have just been my mistake, as now that I think about it, it had the caveat of "related employment." I think math bachelors were the most employable in that break out, with physics at the worse end of the spectrum, nearing 30%.
     
  9. Dec 30, 2015 #8

    Student100

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    Are you going to do a MS, a MEng, or a MAS?

    UCSD offers a MAS and with some internships at Qualcomm for their wireless embedded systems program. At least they used to. It also includes a capstone project.

    You should contact the program you're interested in and inquire to them if they offer internships/projects/work experience/and sources of funding, I don't know.

    You aren't going to have all the skills an EE bachelors would get you, so when employers are asking for general experience in EE you don't have, you'd be at a disadvantage most likely - it's impossible to say for sure.
     
  10. Dec 30, 2015 #9


    I am leaning more towards a MEng. So in the end would it be worth it for me to go after the Masters if I am less competitive than a BS or should i just go back and get the BSEE?
     
  11. Dec 30, 2015 #10
    I
    I have a been able to gain some experience in EE l. I was part of a physics research lab where I had to do a lot of soldering, tuning RF circuits, used network analyzers and oscilloscope. I have designed RF curcuits and built them, but at the end of the day I have a physics degree so I couldnt get any EE internships.
     
  12. Dec 30, 2015 #11

    Student100

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    Is it worth another 80k in students loans for a new bachelors then MS? I can't answer that for you. Once you find a job with a BS in physics and MS in engineering, get some work experience, pay off any loans you have, the degree will become gradually less important.
     
  13. Dec 30, 2015 #12
    I think it will be much less than that. Tuition at CUNY is about 3500 a semester and most likely with my degree I will cut my time shorter i am guessing i can get the BS in 2-3 yrs. That being said would you change your response?
     
  14. Dec 30, 2015 #13

    Student100

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    Great, why don't you find a MS in engineering for something RF related? Signal processing for satellite modems, antenna design, link budgets, etc? If you can solder, know how to use NA, OS, Spec Ans, etc, then you already have many of the skills people find useful in those types of fields. Signal processing is pretty hot right now.
     
  15. Dec 30, 2015 #14

    Student100

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    No, it's up to you. Will CUNY let you enroll in a second bachelors? Not every school will.
     
  16. Dec 30, 2015 #15
    Yes, I would be able to apply for a second bachelors, and my time would be shorter as compared to a freshmen just starting off as EE major.
     
  17. Dec 30, 2015 #16

    Student100

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    To me it wouldn't be worth it, but if it is to you, and you don't mind the expense, go for it.
     
  18. Dec 30, 2015 #17
    So you think with my previous experience joining a Masters program in Signal Processing would make more sense?
     
  19. Dec 30, 2015 #18

    Student100

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    It's an option. The whole point of not going to get a second bachelors is to save time and money for something that will become less important as time goes on in your career.

    If you already have experience with the tools used in RF engineering - would be able to put that you know what a smith chart is, what modulated RF is, how to use various test equipment, and other general RF things on a resume- then it makes sense to get a masters in engineering that focuses on this background knowledge to me. Signal processing is just one option. You'll be able to meet more criteria that employers are looking for in a entry level engineer, and need less background EE classes to get up to speed.

    You might have a harder time initially finding a entry level job, but once you do and gain experience, there is no added benefit to get a second bachelors in engineering. This is all just my assumptions and very limited experience, but maybe someone else can provide better input.
     
  20. Dec 31, 2015 #19
    My BS was in Physics and I am currently in a master's of engineering focusing in in electronics and materials.

    On average, as already posted, most likely you will be required to take certain BS courses. In my case I entered a program that was VERY receptive of hard science students. They cared more about my quantitative background.

    It's not impossible to find work, but it does become difficult when they specifically seek a BS person. However a good internship usually patches this over as already mentioned.

    Another thing to consider is school. Elephant in the room is that not all engineering schools are created equal. Some institutions have more lenient standards, so your physics background could be more than sufficient in those cases.
     
  21. Dec 31, 2015 #20
    That's not true, this is anecdotal but I knew a math major/physics minor who got into an MSEE program. She was required to take some remidial classes like circuits, electronics, signals and such but nothing 'loaded up' to speak of.
     
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