At a crossroads between MS in CS or EE

  • Programs
  • Thread starter AKing2713
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Cs Ee
In summary: I don't know. I feel like I have a solid foundation in mathematics and I don't think taking additional classes would hurt me. It just seems like a lot more work than just getting a MSEE.
  • #1
AKing2713
11
0
I am currently finishing up a BS in Mathematics with a concentration in statistics and can't decide which route to take in education and career. I am currently active duty Air Force and fix/teach people how to fix jets (been in for 12 years). I am transferring to the reserves to finish out my career in the military there and want to start down a civilian career path in the near future. I studied mathematics as I really had no idea what to do as far as career outside the military and felt Mathematics was general enough I could pivot when I got to my Masters into something a bit more specialized. I have narrowed it down to two fields I am very interested in and having trouble committing.

The first is data science/machine learning and the MS in CS would be the degree for this one. I don't have to tell you how hot the job market is on this one and feel like it will be for a long time. This one better aligns towards my mathematics degree and I have already been dabbling in machine learning building models in my spare time.

The second is semiconductor manufacturing and the MS in EE would be the degree for this one. Again, I feel like the job market will always be in demand for these engineers and the recent chip shortage is confirmation of that. This one better aligns toward my current job of being a technician (I know its a far cry from what I am doing now but its in the same vein).

Both of these career and education paths sound so interesting and I can't decide. Was wondering if any1 in these fields might shed some light on them. Also, I know PHDs are fairly common for both of these fields and wouldn't be opposed to pursing one if it made sense.

Thank you for the read!
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
They are both excellent fields and it's really just a matter of your personal interest. My own belief is that CS jobs are even more available than EE and are likely to remain so for the foreseeable future, but that really should be a secondary concern. "If you love what you do you'll never work a day in your life."

EDIT: I should add: I've been both and have considerable experience w/ both, although my EE days are LONG behind me.
 
  • #3
You should see if your background in math is sufficient to get you in a MSEE program. Also, if you are shooting for a job in semiconductor fab, a lot of those folsk have PhDs in solid state physics or materials science.
 
  • #4
phinds said:
They are both excellent fields and it's really just a matter of your personal interest. My own belief is that CS jobs are even more available than EE and are likely to remain so for the foreseeable future, but that really should be a secondary concern. "If you love what you do you'll never work a day in your life."

EDIT: I should add: I've been both and have considerable experience w/ both, although my EE days are LONG behind me.
I can see myself being happy at both jobs so I am just not sure which 1 to go for. What did you do when you were doing EE if you don't mind me asking?
 
  • #5
Vanadium 50 said:
You should see if your background in math is sufficient to get you in a MSEE program. Also, if you are shooting for a job in semiconductor fab, a lot of those folsk have PhDs in solid state physics or materials science.
It does seem like the standard that anyone working in the semiconductor field doing research and development or even some types engineering all have PhDs. I wouldn't be opposed to a PhD but might be a bit tough coming from a more mathematics background instead of an EE background. Also, I have looked into a few MSEE programs. You are correct in asking that some do require an EE BS but there are quite a few programs that accept other BS such as mathematics. Worst case is I have to take a few undergrad EE classes in order to be accepted.
 
  • #6
AKing2713 said:
I can see myself being happy at both jobs so I am just not sure which 1 to go for. What did you do when you were doing EE if you don't mind me asking?
I designed digital circuitry for both airborne (small rockets) and ground station telemetry systems for NASA. Extremely primitive by today's standards but very cool for the time. I also wrote some of the data conversion software which is how I got into programming.
 
  • #7
Thank you for your service. (Army brat here) :smile:
AKing2713 said:
I wouldn't be opposed to a PhD but might be a bit tough coming from a more mathematics background instead of an EE background.
I think the EE/Semiconductors route is pretty far from your math background, and the CS/AI/Machine Learning seems a better fit, IMO. The Semiconductor Physics and Material Science aspects of EE/Semiconductors are pretty involved and specialized, and unless you've taken a few classes in them you won't really know if you enjoy them nor not. You could start to get into complicated Semiconductor Physics classes and find out that you don't really enjoy them (or maybe even aren't understanding them at an intuitive level).

Best of luck in whichever path you choose.
 
  • Like
Likes onatirec and phinds

Related to At a crossroads between MS in CS or EE

1. What is the difference between MS in CS and MS in EE?

MS in CS (Computer Science) focuses on the study of algorithms, programming languages, and software development, while MS in EE (Electrical Engineering) focuses on the study of electronics, circuits, and systems. CS is more software-oriented, while EE is more hardware-oriented. Both degrees involve some overlap in coursework, such as computer architecture and digital systems.

2. Which degree is more in demand in the job market?

Both MS in CS and MS in EE are highly sought after in the job market. However, the demand for CS professionals has been steadily increasing in recent years due to the rapid growth of the technology industry. EE professionals are also in demand, particularly in fields such as telecommunications, power systems, and robotics.

3. What career opportunities are available for each degree?

With an MS in CS, you can pursue careers in software development, data science, artificial intelligence, and more. An MS in EE can lead to careers in fields such as telecommunications, power systems, robotics, and biomedical engineering. Both degrees offer a wide range of career opportunities, and your specific interests and skills will play a role in determining which path is best for you.

4. Can I pursue both degrees simultaneously?

Some universities offer dual degree programs where students can earn both an MS in CS and an MS in EE simultaneously. However, these programs are typically more rigorous and may take longer to complete. It is important to carefully consider your goals and workload before deciding to pursue both degrees at once.

5. Which degree is better for someone with a background in math or physics?

Both degrees require a strong foundation in math and physics. However, an MS in EE may be a better fit for someone with a strong interest in circuits, electronics, and systems. On the other hand, an MS in CS may be a better fit for someone with a strong interest in algorithms, programming, and software development. Ultimately, it depends on your specific interests and career goals.

Similar threads

  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
12
Views
1K
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
12
Views
2K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
8
Views
2K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
4
Views
2K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
7
Views
675
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
10
Views
4K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
3
Views
734
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
19
Views
5K
Back
Top