Business Math Exam Fiasco: Lessons Learned?

In summary: If you were familair with the software, you should have known that the answers required are usually not entered in scientific notation i.e I had an online assignment for first year physics and we were required to enter angles. After my first use of the software I found out that the program only accepted degrees and not radians. Hence, my next answers where all in...whatever.
  • #1
1MileCrash
1,342
41
For a math elective. Our exams are online.

I did very poorly on the first exam because I wrote almost all of my answers that warranted it in scientific notation purely out of habit, which were all graded as incorrect.

I of course emailed the professors protesting, they will meet and talk about it apparently.

Moral:
Don't take business maths.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Dang! Maybe the exams were graded by TAs who didn't know better...?
 
  • #3
No, it is "auto-graded," I received my score as soon as I hit submit. Usually it's pretty intelligent at grading, there are multiple ways an answer can be typed out and still be correct.
 
  • #4
Did it explicitly say which format was required ?
 
  • #5
1MileCrash said:
For a math elective. Our exams are online.

I did very poorly on the first exam because I wrote almost all of my answers that warranted it in scientific notation purely out of habit, which were all graded as incorrect.

I of course emailed the professors protesting, they will meet and talk about it apparently.

Moral:
Don't take business maths.

Not really much to do with business math, but that sucks. Hopefully you'll get it sorted out.
 
  • #6
gb7nash said:
Not really much to do with business math, but that sucks. Hopefully you'll get it sorted out.

I don't see why a superior way of writing large or small quantities (of whatever that may be) shouldn't be used across all maths.
 
  • #7
1MileCrash said:
I don't see why a superior way of writing large or small quantities (of whatever that may be) shouldn't be used across all maths.

That's just it. It just depends what you're doing. If you deal with large/small numbers a lot, I agree. A lot of people don't like getting used to scientific notation though. I can't remember the last time I saw anyone write in scientific notation. I saw it more in physics than math classes, where significant figures are very important. Just realize this issue isn't limited to business calculus. It could happen in any class.
 
  • #8
If your instructor won't budge on this point (which would be silly but it happens), you might make the argument that you made one mistake - not using the proper number format. While it's true that that one mistake is evident in many of the problems, it's still basically just one mistake. I'd argue that you shouldn't be marked down more than once (if at all).
 
  • #9
I agree with lisab but if it was explicitly mentioned that you should write your answers in a specific format, you might not have a case.

Sometimes an answer simply is not enough unless expressed in the "appropriate format".

I have gotten nabbed for silly things like this.
 
Last edited:
  • #10
╔(σ_σ)╝ said:
I agree with lisab but if it was explicitly mentioned that you should write your answers in a specific format, you might not have a case.

Even so, if the professor is nice enough, (s)he'll let it slide once. It certainly wouldn't hurt to have a talk with the professor.
 
  • #11
╔(σ_σ)╝ said:
I agree with lisab but if it was explicitly mentioned that you should write your answers in a specific format, you might not have a case.

No, it's a very simple and basic system. It's on "mymathlab.com." I'm sure many of you have used it before. Nothing is really mentioned, you just log in and take your test.

It is textbook based, the instructor does not make the test. It is randomized questions based on the chapter's subject matter.
 
  • #12
1MileCrash said:
No, it's a very simple and basic system. It's on "mymathlab.com." I'm sure many of you have used it before. Nothing is really mentioned, you just log in and take your test.

I would fight it then. If there's nowhere on the site that specifies and the professor didn't tell you, you should get the credit back.
 
  • #13
I don't mean to discourage you but typically you are expected to be familiar with the system prior to major exams.

Anyway, I wish you the best on your case.
 
  • #14
╔(σ_σ)╝ said:
I don't mean to discourage you but typically you are expected to be familiar with the system prior to major exams.

Anyway, I wish you the best on your case.

I've had it in other classes. In what way have I demonstrated a lack of familiarity? :confused:
 
  • #15
1MileCrash said:
I've had it in other classes. In what way have I demonstrated a lack of familiarity? :confused:

Well, I figured you should have been aware of how the answers are usually entered and acted accordingly.

If you were familair with the software, you should have known that the answers required are usually not entered in scientific notation i.e I had an online assignment for first year physics and we were required to enter angles. After my first use of the software I found out that the program only accepted degrees and not radians. Hence, my next answers where all in degrees.
 
  • #16
They decided to give me full credit for all answers, whew.
 
  • #17
1MileCrash said:
It is textbook based, the instructor does not make the test. It is randomized questions based on the chapter's subject matter.

gb7nash said:
I would fight it then. If there's nowhere on the site that specifies and the professor didn't tell you, you should get the credit back.

I would note here, that if it is based on textbooks and the textbooks have a specific notation, that should be all you need.

If for example, the textbooks have always written 1,000,000 instead of 1x106 then you should be aware what format they are expecting.
 
  • #18
1MileCrash said:
They decided to give me full credit for all answers, whew.

I'm glad your instructors are reasonable!
 

What is business calculus?

Business calculus is a branch of mathematics that focuses on solving real-world problems related to business and economics. It involves the use of mathematical concepts and techniques to analyze and model business situations.

Why is it important to take a business calculus class?

Business calculus is important because it provides valuable skills and knowledge that can be applied in various fields such as finance, economics, marketing, and management. It also helps in developing critical thinking and problem-solving skills.

What topics are typically covered in a business calculus class?

A business calculus class usually covers topics such as functions, limits, derivatives, optimization, and integration. These topics are specifically applied to business and economic scenarios.

Do I need a strong math background to take a business calculus class?

While a strong math background can be helpful, it is not necessarily required to take a business calculus class. However, a basic understanding of algebra and trigonometry is usually recommended.

How can business calculus be applied in the real world?

Business calculus can be applied in various real-world situations such as calculating profit and loss, analyzing market trends, determining optimal production levels, and making financial decisions. It is a valuable tool for businesses to make informed and strategic decisions.

Similar threads

Replies
1
Views
44
Replies
4
Views
1K
Replies
15
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
17
Views
2K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
3
Views
5K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
11
Views
1K
  • General Discussion
Replies
8
Views
3K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
13
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
5
Views
2K
Replies
127
Views
16K
Back
Top