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Calbuco volcano erupts in Chile

  1. Apr 22, 2015 #1

    Astronuc

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 22, 2015 #2
    Wow that is amazing video!
     
  4. Apr 22, 2015 #3

    davenn

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    indeed !! thanks for the heads up, Astronuc :smile:
     
  5. Apr 23, 2015 #4
    Lots of great photos coming out ImageUploadedByPhysics Forums1429804956.207360.jpg ImageUploadedByPhysics Forums1429804972.452420.jpg
     
  6. Apr 23, 2015 #5

    davenn

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  7. Apr 23, 2015 #6

    Astronuc

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    One commentator mentioned no lava, but that bright red spout looks like lava to me.

    Pretty intense eruption with an interesting cloud formation.



    http://www.news.com.au/world/incred...-the-second-time/story-fndir2ev-1227317876287

    That volcano is in the Southern Volcanic Zone of the Andean Volcanic Belt.


    Volcanism and associated hazards: the Andean perspective



    Active Andean volcanism: its geologic and tectonic setting


    Ubinas in southern Peru was a little active last week.


    Observatorio Volcanológico del Sur (OVS) - Peru

    Observatorio Volcanológico de Los Andes del Sur (OVDAS) - Chile
    http://www.sernageomin.cl/volcanes.php
    Calbuco
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2015
  8. Apr 26, 2015 #7
    From spaceweather.com :

    VOLCANIC BULLS-EYE: When Chile's Calbuco volcano erupted on April 22nd, plumes of ash and volcanic gas shot more than 50,000 ft above Earth's surface. Orbiting overhead in the darkness of space, the NOAA/NASA Suomi NPP satellite observed the ripple effect of the blast. Night had fallen over the volcano during the early hours of April 23rd when a low-light camera on the satellite photographed a "bulls-eye" pattern of waves centered on the rising plume:

    bullseye_strip.jpg

    Ripples like these have been observed before, high above powerful thunderstorms. They are called "gravity waves"--essentially, waves of pressure and temperature excited by the upward motion of air. (Gravity does not vary inside the waves; the waves get their name from the fact that gravity acts as a vertical restoring force that tries to restore equilibrium to up-and-down moving air.)

    The waves are visible because they glow. Readers of spaceweather.com haveseen the phenomenon before--it's called "airglow." Airglow is caused by an assortment of chemical reactions in the upper atmosphere driven mainly by solar ultraviolet radiation. Gravity waves rippling away from the central axis of a thunderstorm or, in this case, a volcano, cause temperature and density perturbations in the upper atmosphere. Those perturbations alter the chemical reaction rates of airglow, leading to more-bright or less-bright bands depending on whether the rates are boosted or diminished, respectively.

    Airglow occurs about 100 km above Earth's surface alongside meteors, noctilucent clouds and even some auroras. This makes airglow--and the bullseye above Calbuco--a true space weather phenomenon.
     
  9. Apr 26, 2015 #8

    davenn

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    cool, never seen an image of anything like that before

    thanks for sharing :smile:
     
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