Calculate how many alpha-particles from the decay will be detected

  • Thread starter EDerkatch
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In summary, the question asks for the number of alpha-particles that will be detected in 1 hour from the decay of 1 mg (0.001 g) of the 239Pu isotope. Assuming 100% detection efficiency, the number of atoms in 1 mg can be calculated using the Avogadro Constant and then multiplied by the decay rate, T1/2 = 24119 yr, to determine the number of alpha-particles detected in 1 hour.
  • #1
EDerkatch
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"1 mg (0.001 g) of the isotope 239Pu is placed inside a detector. 239Pu alpha-decays with a half-life of T1/2 = 24119 yr. Calculate how many alpha-particles from the decay will be detected in 1 hour. (Assume 100% detection efficiency)."
Could someone please show me how to do this question?

Thanks:).
 
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  • #2
EDerkatch said:
"1 mg (0.001 g) of the isotope 239Pu is placed inside a detector. 239Pu alpha-decays with a half-life of T1/2 = 24119 yr. Calculate how many alpha-particles from the decay will be detected in 1 hour. (Assume 100% detection efficiency)."
Could someone please show me how to do this question?

Thanks:).


This is Homework?

I can give you a hint before you answer my question.

How many 239Pu isotopes are there in 1mg ?
 
  • #3
malawi_glenn said:
This is Homework?

I can give you a hint before you answer my question.

How many 239Pu isotopes are there in 1mg ?

Yes this is. I really don't know how to work that out right now, could you give me a hint?
 
  • #4
If it is HW then It must be posted there, do so in the future!

So you have no idea how to work out how many atoms a certain amount of mass have? You must be joking! How can you get a HW of this kind if you have not been taught how to do that?
 
  • #5
I would have guessed you would need to use the Avogadro Constant? That would tell you how many atoms are in a mole. Would I be correct in saying that malawi_glenn?
 
  • #6
_Mayday_ : you are right. I want to stress that the OP should have learned how to find out the number of atoms of certain element given the mass of the sample b4 he should get an excersice of this kind. And if he haven't, I could point him to a tutorial and that he must talk to his teacher. He must also show that he has made an effort, it is so simple to find out things my using google :P Now you gave him a keyword, he can google that and he will find out how to find the number of atoms of one kind in a sample given its mass.
 

Related to Calculate how many alpha-particles from the decay will be detected

1. How do you calculate the number of alpha-particles detected from decay?

The number of alpha-particles detected from decay can be calculated using the formula N = N0(1-e-λt), where N0 is the initial number of radioactive atoms, λ is the decay constant, and t is the time interval.

2. What is an alpha-particle?

An alpha-particle is a type of particle emitted during radioactive decay. It consists of two protons and two neutrons, making it identical to a helium nucleus.

3. How is the decay constant determined?

The decay constant is determined by the type of radioactive material and can be found in reference tables. It is a measure of the rate at which the material decays.

4. Can the number of detected alpha-particles be predicted with 100% accuracy?

No, the number of detected alpha-particles cannot be predicted with 100% accuracy. It is a probabilistic process and can vary due to external factors such as temperature and pressure.

5. How does the number of detected alpha-particles change over time?

The number of detected alpha-particles decreases over time as the radioactive material decays. This is because the initial number of radioactive atoms decreases and the probability of detecting an alpha-particle decreases as well.

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