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Calculate point in ellipse given a unit vector

  1. Jun 30, 2011 #1
    Hi to everyone.

    I'm detecting collision between two ellipses. I've got my unit vector, my ellipse center and radius (horizontal and vertical). I want to calculate the point that lies in the ellipse on the direction of the unit vector. See the image attached. Suppose the red arrow is my unit vector and I want to get the coordinates of the green colored point. I'm just multiplying my unit vector times my radius plus the center of the ellipse. The formula looks like this:

    Code (Text):


    //Assume unit vector has been already calculated at this stage, ellipseCenter and ellipseRadius has been given
    Vector pointInEllipse = VectorMake(unitVector.x * ellipseRadius.x + ellipseCenter.x, unitVector.y * ellipseRadius.y + ellipseCenter.y);

     
    The point I get using the above formula lies on the ellipse, but it's translated on both axis a little bit, translated enough to detect collisions when haven't occurred any.
    What am I missing here?

    Thank you very much in advance.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 30, 2011 #2

    LCKurtz

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    I've never heard of an ellipse radius. If the equation of the ellipse is

    [tex]\frac{x^2}{a^2}+\frac{y^2}{b^2}=1[/tex]

    what quantity represents the "ellipse radius"?
     
  4. Jun 30, 2011 #3
    I apologize for that, it's a and b from that equation, ellipseRadius.x = a and ellipseRadius.y = b.
     
  5. Jun 30, 2011 #4

    LCKurtz

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    I have trouble deciphering your syntax in that programming language. But if you have a unit vector you have the slope m. Assuming the picture is translated to the origin, why not just solve y = mx with the equation of the ellipse? A quick calculation seems to show you just need to calculate something like

    [tex]x=\pm\frac{ab}{\sqrt{m^2+b^2}}[/tex]
     
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