Calculate the terminal velocity from a displacement-time graph?

In summary, the discussion centered around calculating terminal velocity from a displacement-time graph. The person was looking for an explanation on how to calculate it and was confused about whether the gradient of the graph would give them the terminal velocity or not. The conversation also touched on the definition of terminal velocity and its relationship to displacement, velocity, and acceleration. The suggestion was made to find the slope where the graph becomes linear in order to determine the terminal velocity.
  • #1
fickle
19
0
Hi

Can someone please explain how I can calculate the terminal velocity from a displacement-time graph? I'm only finding solutions to velocity-time graphs, but that's not what I need.

Thanks in advance.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
What is the definition of terminal velocity?
 
  • #3
EDIT:removed... too much explaining
 
Last edited:
  • #4
I understand terminal velocity to be the velocity reached by a falling body when it experiences zero acceleration... All I have is the displacement and time to work with and I know that the gradient of the graph will give me the velocity. I'm just confused if the value I'll get for the gradient is actually the terminal velocity I'm being asked for or not. When I've looked this up, I'm seeing other things about the mass, drag, density, etc. to get the terminal velocity. Since I wasn't given these values I'm thinking the most logical thing is to find the gradient, but this may be wrong. Any help would be really appreciated here.
 
  • #5
You know that terminal velocity is the maximum speed and it is constant. You know that velocity is the gradient. So why don't you try the maximum gradient that is constant.
 
  • #6
While accelerating, displacement is quadratic, velocity is linear, and acceleration is constant. At terminal velocity, displacement is linear, velocity is constant, and acceleration is zero. Find the slope where the graph becomes linear
 

Related to Calculate the terminal velocity from a displacement-time graph?

1. What is terminal velocity?

Terminal velocity is the maximum velocity that an object can reach when falling through a fluid, such as air or water. At this point, the force of gravity is balanced by the resistance of the fluid, resulting in a constant velocity.

2. How can I calculate terminal velocity from a displacement-time graph?

To calculate terminal velocity from a displacement-time graph, you will need to measure the slope of the line during the terminal velocity phase. This slope will represent the constant velocity of the object, which is the terminal velocity.

3. What is the formula for calculating terminal velocity?

The formula for calculating terminal velocity is Vt = mg/c, where Vt is the terminal velocity, m is the mass of the object, g is the acceleration due to gravity, and c is the drag coefficient of the object.

4. Why is it important to calculate terminal velocity?

Calculating terminal velocity is important in understanding the motion of objects through a fluid. It can also help in predicting the behavior of objects in different environments, such as during skydiving or in fluid dynamics research.

5. What factors affect the terminal velocity of an object?

The terminal velocity of an object is affected by the object's mass, size, shape, and the properties of the fluid it is falling through. Other factors such as air pressure and temperature can also play a role in determining terminal velocity.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
10
Views
369
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
776
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
906
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
10
Views
852
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
637
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
11
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
14
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
188
Back
Top