Calculating Frequency in an Acoustic Tube Ring

In summary, the conversation discusses the calculation of frequencies in a rotating inflated tube that is in constant contact with a surface. The speaker is trying to determine the mathematical formula for the resonance frequencies in this scenario and suggests looking into the theory of Leslie Loudspeakers.
  • #1
3
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Hey!

I understand frequency calculations in tubes, open ended or closed, however what would you classify a tube ring? Imagine a rube ring brushing against something constantly, if the tube was static and it made contact with something, you'll get waves traveling around in both directions inside the tube... now if if the tube was spinning whilst in contact with a surface, you'll have waves but there will be a phase shift in the 'backward' and 'forward' waves and get two resonant peaks.
My question is how do you calculate the frequency in this as it's basically an infinite length tube and do you even use the open/closed tube frequency formulae?

Thanks
 
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  • #3
I think I've mislead with the title...

There's a rotating inflated tube that is in constant contact with a surface. You can hear the noise from this contact and the frequencies have distinctive peaks due to the resonance in tube... I'm trying to figure out how to calculate mathematically those frequencies.
 

1. How do you calculate the frequency in an acoustic tube ring?

The frequency in an acoustic tube ring can be calculated using the formula: f = (nv)/2L, where f is the frequency, n is the harmonic number, v is the speed of sound, and L is the length of the tube.

2. What is the difference between the frequency in an acoustic tube ring and in a traditional tube?

The main difference is that the frequency in an acoustic tube ring is dependent on the length of the tube, while the frequency in a traditional tube is dependent on both the length and diameter of the tube.

3. Can you calculate the frequency in an acoustic tube ring using different units?

Yes, as long as the units are consistent. For example, if the length of the tube is measured in meters, then the speed of sound should also be in meters per second.

4. How does the frequency change if the length of the acoustic tube ring is changed?

As the length of the tube is increased, the frequency will decrease. Likewise, as the length is decreased, the frequency will increase.

5. How do you determine the speed of sound in an acoustic tube ring?

The speed of sound can be measured using a device called a sound level meter, which can measure the time it takes for a sound wave to travel through the tube and calculate the speed based on the distance and time.

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