Calculating Hip Joint Force/Stress During Walking/Running

  • Thread starter Michaelcarson11
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In summary, the person is seeking help in calculating the approximate force/stress on a hip joint during walking and/or running. They want to keep it simple for a presentation and are planning to estimate the force produced on impact with the floor and divide it by the approximate cross-sectional area to find the stress. They are looking for help with the approximations, but it may be difficult to approximate the actual force due to variations in mass among individuals.
  • #1
Michaelcarson11
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Homework Statement


Can anybody help me calculate the approximate force/ stress on a hip joint during walking and/or running
Any help is greatly appreciated.


Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution

 
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  • #2
What are your initial thoughts? We need to see something from you on questions #2 and #3 in order to help you. What forces and timescales are involved?
 
  • #3
All i want to find out is the approximate stress for each step that a person takes.

I need to keep it quite simple for a presentation that i am doing so i was going to try and estimate the force that is produced on impact with the floor and then divide that by the approximate cross-sectional area to find the stress.

I just need some help with the approximations.

Any help appreciated
 
  • #4
well the actual force would be hard to approximate because it varies from person to person due to mass change.. at least that is what i would think
 

Related to Calculating Hip Joint Force/Stress During Walking/Running

1. What is the purpose of calculating hip joint force/stress during walking/running?

The purpose of calculating hip joint force/stress during walking/running is to understand the load and strain placed on the hip joint during these activities. This information can be used to evaluate the risk of injury, optimize training and rehabilitation programs, and inform the design of assistive devices for individuals with hip joint issues.

2. How is hip joint force/stress calculated during walking/running?

Hip joint force and stress can be calculated using biomechanical models that incorporate factors such as body weight, walking/running speed, and joint angles. These models use principles of physics and mathematics to estimate the internal forces and stresses acting on the hip joint during movement.

3. What are the factors that can affect hip joint force/stress during walking/running?

Some of the factors that can affect hip joint force/stress during walking/running include body weight, walking/running speed, joint angles and positions, muscle strength and activation patterns, and any underlying joint or muscle abnormalities.

4. How does hip joint force/stress change with age?

As we age, our bones become less dense and our muscles tend to weaken. This can lead to increased stress and strain on the hip joint during walking/running, as the joint has to work harder to support the body. Additionally, age-related conditions such as osteoarthritis can also contribute to increased hip joint force and stress.

5. What are the potential consequences of high hip joint force/stress during walking/running?

High hip joint force and stress can potentially lead to various hip joint injuries such as fractures, tendonitis, and labral tears. It may also aggravate existing joint conditions such as osteoarthritis. This is why it is important to monitor and manage hip joint force and stress, especially for individuals who engage in high-impact activities like running.

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