Calculating Maximum [Ca2+] Without Precipitation: Ksp for CaC2O4 = 2.6e-9

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In summary, the question asks for the maximum concentration of calcium ions that can exist in a solution containing 5.2e-4 M of oxalate ions without precipitating. The given Ksp for CaC2O4 is 2.6e-9. The student is unsure how to apply these values and is seeking help. They are also unsure if they should use the formula for solubility or solubility product for calcium oxalate since it is not explicitly stated in the question.
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Homework Statement



What is the maximum [Ca2+] that can exist with 5.2e-4 M c2O4 2- without precipitating? Ksp for CaC2O4 = 2.6e-9.

Homework Equations



Well, the Ksp and M is given, I don't know how to apply them.

The Attempt at a Solution



I need help because I missed the lesson.

Thank you.
 
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  • #2
Do you know Kso formula looks alike for calcium oxalate?
 
  • #3
Pardon? I don't know what you are saying.

If you mean what it is, I don't think I'm supposed to use it since it's not a given in the question.
 
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  • #4
Bump. Someone please help me.
 
  • #5
Sorry, I wrote Kso instead of Ksp - but these are the same, one stands for solubility, second for solubility product. Do you know formula for solubility product for calcium oxalate? Note that Ksp for calcium oxalate is given.
 

What is an equilibrium precipitate?

An equilibrium precipitate is a solid substance that forms when two or more solutions are mixed together and the products of the reaction reach a state of equilibrium. This means that the rate of formation of the precipitate is equal to the rate of dissolution, resulting in a constant concentration of the precipitate in the solution.

What factors influence the formation of an equilibrium precipitate?

The formation of an equilibrium precipitate is influenced by factors such as temperature, concentration of the reactants, and the solubility of the products. These factors can affect the rate of formation and dissolution of the precipitate, ultimately determining the concentration of the precipitate in the solution.

How is an equilibrium precipitate different from a regular precipitate?

An equilibrium precipitate is different from a regular precipitate in that it is formed at a constant rate due to the balance between formation and dissolution. A regular precipitate, on the other hand, forms quickly and continuously until the reactants are consumed or the conditions for precipitation are no longer met.

What techniques are used to measure the concentration of an equilibrium precipitate?

There are several techniques that can be used to measure the concentration of an equilibrium precipitate, such as gravimetric analysis, titration, and spectrophotometry. These methods involve measuring the mass, volume, or absorbance of the precipitate to determine its concentration in the solution.

How is the solubility of an equilibrium precipitate affected by changes in temperature?

The solubility of an equilibrium precipitate is typically affected by changes in temperature. In general, an increase in temperature leads to an increase in solubility, while a decrease in temperature leads to a decrease in solubility. However, this relationship may vary depending on the specific substances involved in the precipitation reaction.

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