Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Calculating the force at a single point of contact

  1. Aug 19, 2009 #1
    Hi all

    May be someone can help me with this problem.

    There is a isa-chrome60 wire (d=0.5 mm, tensile strength=600 N/mm^2) which is held at both ends using end connectors ( length of the wire = 20mm). And there is a nylon wire (d=0.5 mm) which is under tension (because of torsion spring) and it is held by chrome wire at a single point. Say the force acting on the fishing line is 2 N. I would like to know if it would be possible to know that the chrome wire could withstand this much of force or not?
    Is there any mathematical way to do that?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 22, 2009 #2

    vk6kro

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    There is a isa-chrome60 wire (d=0.5 mm, tensile strength=600 N/mm^2) which is held at both ends using end connectors ( length of the wire = 20mm). And there is a nylon wire (d=0.5 mm) which is under tension (because of torsion spring) and it is held by chrome wire at a single point.

    Just on those figures,
    the cross sectional area of the chrome wire is pi * .25 * .25 = 0.196 sq mm
    So the tensile strength should be 600 * 0.196 or 118 N
    This is about the weight of 11 Kg.

    2 N is about the weight of 200 grams.

    So, yes the wire should easily hold the fishing line in a straight line and even applying a force at almost right angles is more likely to break the fishing line than the wire.

    As we discussed elsewhere, the wire may cut the fishing line, though.
     
  4. Aug 22, 2009 #3
    Thanks again vk6kro..
    I had done similar calculations, but wanted to confirm if it was the right way. I thought some tensor matrix might get involved.

    Thanks and Regards
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Calculating the force at a single point of contact
Loading...