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Calculating the resultant force .

  1. Apr 1, 2008 #1
    calculating the resultant force.....

    Use a suitable graphical method to determine the magnitude and direction of the resultant force acting the anchor point of two cables under tension as shown:

    http://viewmorepics.myspace.com/ind...&MyToken=0cb4517b-8fb5-4f73-9f12-3d6a830070da

    (might have to Save As the picture to see it better.)[​IMG]
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 1, 2008 #2

    rock.freak667

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    Repost the picture on a site like http://imageshack.us since I don't have myspace, I apparently can't see the image. So I don't know what is happening in the problem and can't help for the while.
     
  4. Apr 1, 2008 #3
    ok i have sorted that problem, my profile was set as private. u are able to see it now. :P

    LF
     
  5. Apr 1, 2008 #4

    rock.freak667

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    Nope, I still go to what looks like the homepage to me...
     
  6. Apr 1, 2008 #5
    ok ill make an imageshack
     
  7. Apr 1, 2008 #6
    ok i dont really wanna pay for it. what other thing could i use??
     
  8. Apr 1, 2008 #7
    photobucket.com
     
  9. Apr 1, 2008 #8
    <a href="http://s301.photobucket.com/albums/nn60/LiamFermoyle/?action=view&current=untitled.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i301.photobucket.com/albums/nn60/LiamFermoyle/untitled.jpg" border="0" alt="resultant force thing"></a>
     
  10. Apr 1, 2008 #9
    html doesn't work here.
    [​IMG]


    Try tip to tail method?
     
  11. Apr 1, 2008 #10
    dont u see that? erm... and if u get confused about the 30? is actually 30degrees
     
  12. Apr 1, 2008 #11
  13. Apr 1, 2008 #12
  14. Apr 1, 2008 #13

    rock.freak667

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    Well now that I see the picture if you don't want to use that method, you can always resolve the forces into vertical and horizontal components and then easily find the resultant vertical component and the resultant horizontal component and go on from there.
     
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