Calculating the time of an falling object provding with only speed.

In summary, to calculate the time it takes for a stone to fall from the top of a building with an initial speed of 32m/s and a weight of 24N, the mass of the stone (2.449) and gravity (9.8N) are needed. However, without knowing the distance the stone falls, it is impossible to accurately determine the time it takes to reach the ground. The only assumption that can be made is that the stone will strike the ground at a speed of 32m/s, making the flight time one second and the distance traveled 16m.
  • #1
nikkkk
4
0
Question: A stone is falling from the top of a buliding with 32m/s.
Air resistance is so small that it can be neglected.
the weight of the stone is 24N.
Calculate the time in second which the stone takes to reache the ground.
 
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  • #2
Think about the direction of the motion. This is key in solving the problem as it provides you with more data.
 
  • #3
so
Gravity=9.8N
Weight of stone=24N
Mass of stone=2.449

wouldnt i need the data of how long the distance is also?
 
  • #4
seems to me as posted, the question is ambiguous and has no answer. Sure there isn't more?
 
  • #5
Nope it was one of the questions in my exam
 
  • #6
Not enough info as I read it which states that the object is falling with an iniitial v of 32/s. The only hope is to assume that 32'/s is the speed at which it strikes the ground. If so, its trivial. Flight time is one second, and distance is 16'.
 

Related to Calculating the time of an falling object provding with only speed.

1. How do you calculate the time of a falling object with only its speed?

To calculate the time of a falling object with only its speed, you can use the formula t = v/g, where t is the time, v is the initial velocity (or speed) of the object, and g is the acceleration due to gravity (usually 9.8 m/s^2).

2. What if the object is not falling in a vacuum?

If the object is not falling in a vacuum, you will need to take into account the air resistance or drag. This will affect the acceleration of the object, and therefore the time it takes to fall. The formula for time in this case is more complex and depends on the shape and size of the object, as well as the density and viscosity of the air.

3. Can you use this formula for objects with different masses?

Yes, this formula can be used for objects with different masses as long as they are all falling from the same height and under the same conditions (e.g. in a vacuum). This is because the acceleration due to gravity is constant regardless of the mass of the object.

4. What if the object has an initial velocity in addition to its falling speed?

If the object has an initial velocity in addition to its falling speed, you will need to use the formula t = (v + u)/g, where u is the initial velocity and v is the final velocity (which is equal to the falling speed). This formula takes into account the initial velocity of the object and calculates the time it takes to reach the final velocity (falling speed).

5. Is the time calculated the same for objects falling from different heights?

No, the time it takes for an object to fall will vary depending on the height it is falling from. The formula t = v/g assumes that the object is falling from a height of 0 meters. If the object is falling from a different height, you will need to use the formula t = √(2h/g), where h is the height of the object. This formula takes into account the initial velocity of the object as well as the height it is falling from.

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