Calculating Velocity of a Block After Release from a Spring

In summary, the conversation is about a problem involving a 1.10 kg block being held against a spring and compressed a distance of 0.34 m. The question is how fast the block will be moving after it is released and the spring pushes it away. The person is asking for help and is given some guiding questions to think about, including the types of energy involved and their relationship.
  • #1
youxcrushxme
22
0
I know this is probably an easy question but -

A 1.10 kg block is held against a spring of force constant 0.2 104 N/m, compressing it a distance of 0.34 m. How fast is the block moving after it is released and the spring pushes it away?

If someone could just point me in the right direction for this problem I'd appreciate it!
 
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  • #2
youxcrushxme said:
I know this is probably an easy question but -

A 1.10 kg block is held against a spring of force constant 0.2 104 N/m, compressing it a distance of 0.34 m. How fast is the block moving after it is released and the spring pushes it away?

If someone could just point me in the right direction for this problem I'd appreciate it!
Point ==> Energy
 
  • #3
Yup. Try posting your thoughts on this first. What type of energy does a spring store? What type of energy does a body in motion have? What is their relationship? Use this questions as a starter.
 

Related to Calculating Velocity of a Block After Release from a Spring

1. How do you calculate the velocity of a block after it is released from a spring?

The velocity of a block after it is released from a spring can be calculated using the formula: v = √(kx^2/m), where v is the velocity, k is the spring constant, x is the displacement of the block from its equilibrium position, and m is the mass of the block.

2. What is the spring constant and how does it affect the velocity of the block?

The spring constant is a measure of how stiff the spring is, and it is represented by the symbol k. A higher spring constant means that the spring is stiffer and will exert a larger force on the block, resulting in a higher velocity.

3. Can the velocity of the block be negative?

Yes, the velocity of the block can be negative. A negative velocity indicates that the block is moving in the opposite direction of the initial displacement from the spring.

4. What factors can affect the velocity of the block after it is released from a spring?

The velocity of the block can be affected by the spring constant, the displacement of the block from its equilibrium position, and the mass of the block. Other factors such as air resistance and friction may also affect the velocity.

5. Are there any real-life applications of calculating the velocity of a block after it is released from a spring?

Yes, there are many real-life applications of this calculation, such as in engineering and physics experiments. For example, it can be used to determine the speed of a projectile launched from a spring-loaded device or to measure the velocity of a moving object in a spring-based shock absorber.

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