Calculating Wavelength of Electron Emission

In summary, the conversation discusses calculating the wavelength of light emitted when an electron recombines with a hole and loses 2.6eV of electrical potential energy. The equation \lambda = \frac{hc}{E} is used, and it is recommended to convert the energy from eV to joules and to check the units to ensure they match up. The calculated wavelength is 7.65 \times 10^{-26}m, and it is noted that the energy of 2.6eV is unusually high. The conversation ends with a question on how to convert eV to joules.
  • #1
Air
203
0
I need to make sure my method and the formula I have used is correct. Also, my answer for the wavelength seems slightly dodgy. :rolleyes:

Homework Statement


An electron recombines with a hole losing 2.6eV of electrical potential energy. Calculate the wavelength of the light emitted.

Homework Equations


Not given. Equations have to be used ourself.

The Attempt at a Solution


[itex]E = \frac{hc}{\lambda}[/itex]

[itex]\lambda = \frac{hc}{E}[/itex]

[itex]\lambda = \frac{(6.63 \times 10^{-34})(3.00 \times 10^8)}{2.6}[/itex]

[itex]\lambda = 7.65 \times 10^{-26}m[/itex]
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Put units on things and make sure they match up. You'll want to convert 2.6eV to joules.
 
  • #3
You've found the most high energy photon I've ever heard of! ! ! ! Always check the units, you forgot to convert the energy from eV's to Joules.

and I see now that dick just recommended the same thing. . .
 
Last edited:
  • #4
How would I change eV's to Joules?
 
  • #5
1eV=1.60217646*10^(-19) joules. That's what google says when I type in 'electron volt', anyway.
 

Related to Calculating Wavelength of Electron Emission

What is the formula for calculating the wavelength of electron emission?

The formula for calculating the wavelength of electron emission is: λ = h/mv, where λ is the wavelength, h is Planck's constant, m is the mass of the electron, and v is the velocity of the electron.

What is the significance of calculating the wavelength of electron emission?

Calculating the wavelength of electron emission can provide insight into the energy levels and behaviors of electrons within an atom or molecule. It can also be used to determine the characteristics of light emitted by electrons, such as its color or frequency.

How do you determine the velocity of an electron for the wavelength calculation?

The velocity of an electron can be determined using the equation v = √(2KE/m), where v is the velocity, KE is the kinetic energy of the electron, and m is the mass of the electron. The kinetic energy of the electron can be calculated using the equation KE = eV, where e is the charge of an electron and V is the potential difference.

Can the wavelength of electron emission be calculated for all types of electron emission?

No, the wavelength of electron emission can only be calculated for emission processes that involve the release of photons. This includes processes such as photoelectric effect, fluorescence, and phosphorescence. It does not apply to processes like thermal emission or ionization.

How does the wavelength of electron emission change in different energy levels?

The wavelength of electron emission is inversely proportional to the energy level of the electron. This means that as the energy level increases, the wavelength of emission decreases. This relationship is described by the Rydberg formula: 1/λ = R(1/n1^2 - 1/n2^2), where R is the Rydberg constant and n1 and n2 are the initial and final energy levels of the electron, respectively.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
1K
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
4K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
828
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
1K
Back
Top