Can a region of space be free of energy?

  • #1
NeilWallace
26
0
I have read that it is impossible to create a true vacuum that is completely free of matter, energy and radiation due to the effect of blackbody radiation.

Also that in interstellar space there is on average 1 hydrogen atom per cubic centimeter (or something like that) and various background radiation.

Does this mean that every point of space is occupied with energy or the influence of energy of some form? Gravitational etc. And no true vacuum however small can exist.

is it also the case that all energy in the universe (what ever it is) must then be in a sense connected if only by its influence on each other.

And so it makes sense to speak of one entity composed different areas of electrical potential.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
soothsayer
423
4
Yes, this is true for the same reason that you can't get a temperature of absolute zero kelvin, there will always be some level of heat energy. There is also vacuum energy. Yes, technically, every area in space has some influence on every other area of space, because if nothing else, there is always something in an area of space to contribute to gravity via the stress-energy tensor. As for the electric potential thing, I'm not sure, but it sounds right.
 
  • #3
NeilWallace
26
0
That's kind of confirmed my suspicion thanks! I just need to learn some of the hard physics to flesh out whats going on.
 

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