Can a supernova produce multiple stars?

  • #1
Albertgauss
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Main Question or Discussion Point

Can a supernova produce some number of stars after it explodes or will it always produce just one, single star? Can the matter it ejects form multiple stars and solar systems or will there always be just one new star and its only new solar system?
 

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  • #2
stefan r
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Stars and solar systems form out of interstellar clouds made of gas and dust. Large clouds could spawn thousands of stars.

Super nova add dust/gas to interstellar clouds. The shock wave from a supernova can disturb a cloud. Higher density areas are more likely to collapse into stars.

Type II supernova create neutron stars or black holes. It will never be more than one. Type 1a supernova can explode without forming any star.
 
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  • #3
mathman
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The remains consist of a core remnant (neutron star or black hole, depending on size) and a rapidly expanding cloud of particles and radiation.
 
  • #4
sirios
Can a supernova produce some number of stars after it explodes or will it always produce just one, single star? Can the matter it ejects form multiple stars and solar systems or will there always be just one new star and its only new solar system?
hi, the answer is yes, well, when a star explodes it throws 90% of its mass into space and generates 2 × 10 ^ 44 joules of energy, however, it depends a lot on the (mass and size) of the star, and type of supernova , but let's imagine a star 100 times the size of the sun, this will generate smaller stars or even planetary systems. but it does not fool the shock wave that travels the space at more than 20,000 km / s, can gravitationally collapse a nebula nearby, and form planetary stars and systems.
 
  • #5
sirios
hi, the answer is yes, well, when a star explodes it throws 90% of its mass into space and generates 2 × 10 ^ 44 joules of energy, however, it depends a lot on the (mass and size) of the star, and type of supernova , but let's imagine a star 100 times the size of the sun, this will generate smaller stars or even planetary systems. but it does not fool the shock wave that travels the space at more than 20,000 km / s, can gravitationally collapse a nebula nearby, and form planetary stars and systems.
along with it generates neutron stars what we call pulsars, magnetars and black holes, and more there are several types of supernovas.[emoji2]
 
  • #6
davenn
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hi, the answer is yes, well, when a star explodes it throws 90% of its mass into space and generates 2 × 10 ^ 44 joules of energy, however, it depends a lot on the (mass and size) of the star, and type of supernova , but let's imagine a star 100 times the size of the sun, this will generate smaller stars or even planetary systems. but it does not fool the shock wave that travels the space at more than 20,000 km / s, can gravitationally collapse a nebula nearby, and form planetary stars and systems.
This isn't correct ... please refer to Stefan r's post #2

if you want to back that up with scientific papers, I would be delighted :smile:

a supernova will not directly produce other stars from it's blasted out material
BUT some of that material will likely find it's way into other stars as those new stars coalesce out of already existing interstellar gas clouds
that also have some of the SN remnants.

along with it generates neutron stars what we call pulsars, magnetars and black holes, and more there are several types of supernovas.
emoji2.png
there was no need to repeat what stefanr had already posted in post #2


Dave
 

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  • #7
sirios
This isn't correct ... please refer to Stefan r's post #2

if you want to back that up with scientific papers, I would be delighted [emoji2]

a supernova will not directly produce other stars from it's blasted out material
BUT some of that material will likely find it's way into other stars as those new stars coalesce out of already existing interstellar gas clouds
that also have some of the SN remnants.



there was no need to repeat what stefanr had already posted in post #2


Dave
Sorry, but I did not mention it, I mentioned the shock waves, not directly, I think you made a mistake[emoji5]
 
  • #8
davenn
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Sorry, but I did not mention it, I mentioned the shock waves, not directly, I think you made a mistake[emoji5]
no, I read what you said :smile:
again, that would probably not be likely, but as said, if you can find some reputable scientific papers on the subject
I'm all ears :smile:

I would supect that there would already have to be something close to proto-stars forming and the shockwave from the SN would
just give a bit more of a nudge. Either that or the shockwave would have the complete opposite effect and disperse the gas and
other material in the star forming region
 
  • #9
sirios
no, I read what you said [emoji2]
again, that would probably not be likely, but as said, if you can find some reputable scientific papers on the subject
I'm all ears [emoji2]

I would supect that there would already have to be something close to proto-stars forming and the shockwave from the SN would
just give a bit more of a nudge. Either that or the shockwave would have the complete opposite effect and disperse the gas and
other material in the star forming region
I wish you could read some scientific articles that I read, did not go wrong in what I say, but in fact I made a mistake and because of the English that is not perfect, please do not take this as an offense.[emoji5]
 
  • #10
Bandersnatch
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no, I read what you said :smile:
again, that would probably not be likely, but as said, if you can find some reputable scientific papers on the subject
I'm all ears :smile:
It's also my understanding that SN shock-triggered cloud collapse is at least one of the viable methods of initiating star formation in a previously Jeans-stable cloud.
Here's an example paper discussing it in the context of the formation of our Solar system:
THE SUPERNOVA TRIGGERED FORMATION AND ENRICHMENT OF OUR SOLAR SYSTEM, M. Gritschneder, et al.

So as long as that's what is meant here when we're talking about supernovae producing stars, I see no reason why one SN should always trigger just one instability in a nearby cloud.

I wish you could read some scientific articles that I read
If you want your wish to be fulfilled, the best way is to link to what you've read.
 
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  • #11
sirios
It's also my understanding that SN shock-triggered cloud collapse is at least one of the viable methods of initiating star formation in a previously Jeans-stable cloud.
Here's an example paper discussing it in the context of the formation of our Solar system:
THE SUPERNOVA TRIGGERED FORMATION AND ENRICHMENT OF OUR SOLAR SYSTEM, M. Gritschneder, et al.

So as long as that's what is meant here when we're talking about supernovae producing stars, I see no reason why one SN should always trigger just one instability in a nearby cloud.


If you want your wish to be fulfilled, the best way is to link to what you've read.
Thanks so much
 
  • #12
davenn
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It's also my understanding that SN shock-triggered cloud collapse is at least one of the viable methods of initiating star formation in a previously Jeans-stable cloud.
Here's an example paper discussing it in the context of the formation of our Solar system:
THE SUPERNOVA TRIGGERED FORMATION AND ENRICHMENT OF OUR SOLAR SYSTEM, M. Gritschneder, et al.

So as long as that's what is meant here when we're talking about supernovae producing stars, I see no reason why one SN should always trigger just one instability in a nearby cloud.

brilliant, thanks
learn something new every day :smile:
 
  • #13
JDL1964
Can a supernova produce some number of stars after it explodes or will it always produce just one, single star? Can the matter it ejects form multiple stars and solar systems or will there always be just one new star and its only new solar system?
After reading the various replies to your question, I'm wondering why so many are throwing in all kinds of other aspects.
In direct response to your direct question... can one supernova produce multiple stars or always just one? No. One supernova in and of itself will blow off the bulk of its material into space and leave behind only a remnant of what it was behind (be that in whatever form but it won't be a standard star like it was previously), so there's not even the "always just one" that you mentioned. There's simply the remnant of the original star.
Now, IF that supernova took place in relative proximity (preferably inside) to a material dense nebula.... then the shock wave could cause a compression of the nebula material which could then in turn form another star, which in turn could form (depending on the amount of materials) a solar system of planets and so on, but from the way I read your original question, this is outside of the scope of your inquiry as it would require more than just your original supernova star.
 
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  • #14
Bandersnatch
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then the gravitational wave could cause a compression
Surely, you mean the shockwave.
 
  • #15
JDL1964
Surely, you mean the shockwave.
yep, you're perfectly correct, and I need another cup of coffee. not quite awake yet. :)
 
  • #16
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I think this visually answers the OP's question:


This is a time-lapse video of SN 1987A captured between 1994 and 2006. The supernova shock-wave impacting the gas ring compressed and excited the gas causing it to glow. Not all of that gas will collapse to eventually form stars, but some will.
 
  • #17
Albertgauss
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Hi all, I think everything that was put up here answers my question. I don't mind the discussion of aspects not directly related to the question, I feel I do have a clear answer to my questions. The video Glitch posted is very revealing. You can all provide more information about this if you want to but I think I am happy with the responses here.
 

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