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Programs Can I do a degree in physics even if I haven't taken any yet?

Hello everyone!
I wanted to get a little advice here.
I am in India and studying UK education system (IGCSE). So, I didn't take physics as a subject and now I am regretting it because it's too late. Can I do a degree in physics even if I don't have it? I have pretty good knowledge about the subject and sometimes even more than the best students in my school.
I really need help on this, I don't wanna do a job in physics but just to have a deep knowledge about the subject.

Thank You.
 
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jtbell

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You want to get a degree in physics but you don't want to get a job in it? What sort of job do you want to get?

If you were in the US, I would say to get a degree that is suitable for whatever kind of job or career you want, and take physics courses as electives, "for fun". However, I've read that this isn't possible in some or many other educational systems.
 
You want to get a degree in physics but you don't want to get a job in it? What sort of job do you want to get?

If you were in the US, I would say to get a degree that is suitable for whatever kind of job or career you want, and take physics courses as electives, "for fun". However, I've read that this isn't possible in some or many other educational systems.
Basically, I don't wanna do a job. I will already have many sources of finance. But is it possible in any university in USA?
 

jtbell

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Yes, it's common in the US for university students to take classes outside their degree program. Some of those classes are actually required, e.g. a university might require all students to take some English, history, math, science, etc. regardless of what their degree is in. There's usually also room for some freely-chosen elective classes.
 

ZapperZ

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Hello everyone!
I wanted to get a little advice here.
I am in India and studying UK education system (IGCSE). So, I didn't take physics as a subject and now I am regretting it because it's too late. Can I do a degree in physics even if I don't have it? I have pretty good knowledge about the subject and sometimes even more than the best students in my school.
I really need help on this, I don't wanna do a job in physics but just to have a deep knowledge about the subject.

Thank You.
I'm very confused with this whole thread, because it appears that the OP, and @jtbell seem to miss each other's points.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but

1. You're asking if you can still enroll in an undergraduate physics major degree program in the US even if you didn't take A-level-type physics, correct?

2. You want to have an undergraduate degree in physics, but you do NOT want to work in physics or as a physicist, correct?

Besides asking the obvious on why anyone would want to do #2, if it is correct, waste all that money and time, I want to make sure that this scenario that I've outlined below is the accurate situation being asked here.

Zz.
 

jtbell

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I may well have misinterpreted his statement that he is "studying UK education system (IGCSE)". I interpreted it to mean that he is considering going to university in the UK and is studying how the system there works. If he is currently studying under a UK-like educational system, that's a different matter.

In the US, it's certainly possible to enroll in a university and start a physics degree program without having studied physics previously. I would be surprised if one can do this at a place like MIT, but there are plenty of less prestigious universities where it's possible, and where one can get a good education in physics. Especially if he and his family can afford to pay the full tuition rate without scholarships or other financial aid. :oldwink:

Whether it's possible in his own country or some other country, one can't say without knowing which country or countries are being considered. I seem to remember reading here that in the UK system there are ways to make up for missing entrance requirements for some degree programs. The term "foundation courses" comes to my mind, but I don't know if it's the correct one.
 
I may well have misinterpreted his statement that he is "studying UK education system (IGCSE)". I interpreted it to mean that he is considering going to university in the UK and is studying how the system there works. If he is currently studying under a UK-like educational system, that's a different matter.

In the US, it's certainly possible to enroll in a university and start a physics degree program without having studied physics previously. I would be surprised if one can do this at a place like MIT, but there are plenty of less prestigious universities where it's possible, and where one can get a good education in physics. Especially if he and his family can afford to pay the full tuition rate without scholarships or other financial aid. :oldwink:

Whether it's possible in his own country or some other country, one can't say without knowing which country or countries are being considered. I seem to remember reading here that in the UK system there are ways to make up for missing entrance requirements for some degree programs. The term "foundation courses" comes to my mind, but I don't know if it's the correct one.

Yes, I am asking for a undergraduate degree. And Obviously I wanna work as a physicist but not a 9 to 5 worker or some kind of assistance. I can afford the tuition fees. Another thing I wanted to ask is, nope I think that's enough!
 

symbolipoint

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Yes, I am asking for a undergraduate degree. And Obviously I wanna work as a physicist but not a 9 to 5 worker or some kind of assistance. I can afford the tuition fees. Another thing I wanted to ask is, nope I think that's enough!
You ask about Physics degree education without having first taken or formally studied any Physics. In US, this should be possible. If gain admission to college or university, you can put yourself onto a path for undergraduate degree in Physics. The course contained in earning this degree will be several General Education course requirements, specified Mathematics, specified sciences, and specified combinations of Physics courses. You are worried that without Physics courses before college or univerisity, that you would not be allowed into undergraduate program for Physics.. No Worry! You will need and be allowed to start some introductory Physics courses early or early enough into your undergraduate education.
 

CWatters

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Some universities in the UK run Foundation year courses. These are for people who did not study the right subjects at A-level or did not get the right grades. Some universities will guarantee you a place to study for a BSc or MSc if you get good marks on the foundation year. I know foundation years are available as prep for engineering degrees but I don't know if also available as prep for a Physics degree. You would need to investigate.
 

Vanadium 50

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"Wanna" is not a word. It's not even slang. Whatever your chances are, they are significantly reduced if you use non-language like this.

I am asking for a undergraduate degree.
There are many colleges and universities offering a degree in physics that do not require prior physics courses for admission. However, this will put one at a disadvantage.

Obviously I wanna work as a physicist but not a 9 to 5 worker or some kind of assistance
There's the wanna again. Anyway, sorry, but a BS in physics is not sufficient to run your own lab or research program.
 

symbolipoint

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"Wanna" is an abbreviate and spoken form of "want to", and "wanna" is easier to say in speech than "want to"; but it is sloppy, although most often very well understood. It seems like a contraction, but I do not know what it would be called. Nonstandard, maybe? Possibly substandard? If one knows the language well enough, one should take care enough to not use "wanna" in writing. I strongly suggest to not use "wanna" in writing an online forum posting, among other kinds of writings.
 

Evo

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"Wanna" is an abbreviate and spoken form of "want to", and "wanna" is easier to say in speech than "want to"; but it is sloppy, although most often very well understood. It seems like a contraction, but I do not know what it would be called. Nonstandard, maybe? Possibly substandard? If one knows the language well enough, one should take care enough to not use "wanna" in writing. I strongly suggest to not use "wanna" in writing an online forum posting, among other kinds of writings.
"wanna" is not a word in English language. Enough. It is not a word, not even an abbreviation.
 
"Wanna" is not a word. It's not even slang. Whatever your chances are, they are significantly reduced if you use non-language like this.



There are many colleges and universities offering a degree in physics that do not require prior physics courses for admission. However, this will put one at a disadvantage.



There's the wanna again. Anyway, sorry, but a BS in physics is not sufficient to run your own lab or research program.
I am sorry for using that word, I thought it was a physics forum, not an english forum. Now, I am not looking forward to run some lab or research program. I already said it is just for my knowledge, to understand the universe as an individual. I hope you can understand. NOT FOR EARNING MONEY.
 

symbolipoint

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I am sorry for using that word, I thought it was a physics forum, not an english forum. Now, I am not looking forward to run some lab or research program. I already said it is just for my knowledge, to understand the universe as an individual. I hope you can understand. NOT FOR EARNING MONEY.
The two points here are that "wanna" is what is heard in relaxed speaking but the interpretation is "want to". In writing, we should write correctly. And someone with bachelor of science degree is not at all likely qualified to oversee or administer a Physics laboratory. Someone with a more advanced degree would likely be qualified and likely also have some relevant experience. You ain't gonna wanna disagree with that. Do you?

You are not going to want to disagree with that. Do you?
and then member OCR gave a further correction.
 
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StoneTemplePython

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The two points here are that "wanna" is what is heard in relaxed speaking but the interpretation is "want to". In writing, we should write correctly. And someone with bachelor of science degree is not at all likely qualified to oversee or administer a Physics laboratory. Someone with a more advanced degree would likely be qualified and likely also have some relevant experience. You ain't gonna wanna disagree with that. Do you?

You are not going to want to disagree with that. Do you?
and then member OCR gave a further correction.
I am just 15, forgive me...
 

jtbell

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So, I didn't take physics as a subject and now I am regretting it because it's too late. Can I do a degree in physics even if I don't have it?
I am just 15, forgive me...
If you're only 15, how is it too late to take physics? It's still 3 or 4 years before you enter university, right?

In the US, very few students start studying physics seriously before age 15. They start in high school (ages 15-18), usually during the last two years of it.

I originally thought you were near the end of high school (or its equivalent where you are) and about to start applying for universities. I suspect the other people in this thread thought the same way. Usually, the more details you can give about your situation at the beginning of a discussion, the better. :smile:
 
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pinball1970

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I am just 15, forgive me...
Jtbell is right.

Perhaps you can cram it in a year? If you are good at maths and chemistry that will help.

Wanna I would say is more of a dialect where consenants are dropped and vowels shortened. Mancunian speach is like this, not the best way to express oneself, stick to queens\bbc english.
 
If you're only 15, how is it too late to take physics? It's still 3 or 4 years before you enter university, right?

In the US, very few students start studying physics seriously before age 15. They start in high school (ages 15-18), usually during the last two years of it.

I originally thought you were near the end of high school (or its equivalent where you are) and about to start applying for universities. I suspect the other people in this thread thought the same way. Usually, the more details you can give about your situation at the beginning of a discussion, the better. :smile:
We have to choose subjects in grade 9 and I am in grade 10(IGCSE)so I cannot take it. But in 11th grade, my board will change to IB so I think at that time I will able to opt for physics.

So even if I can opt for physics in 11th, will I be able to do IB physics without doing IGCSE physics?
Thank You.
 

jtbell

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IB = International Baccalaureate? I have no experience with that, and because I'm in the US I have no experience with IGCSE except for looking at the Wikipedia article about it. Hopefully someone else here can comment intelligently on them.
 
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StatGuy2000

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Based on the OP's handle name (and from the description of the UK-style education, plus the IB studies), I am assuming that he is from India (please note: Akshat is a male India name). So any of you who are providing advice on this thread will need to take that into account.

To the OP: am I correct?

Note to all on this thread: I have checked the OP's info and he is indeed from India. Therefore, the specifics of the Indian educational system needs to be taken into account when providing advice.
 
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Based on the OP's handle name (and from the description of the UK-style education, plus the IB studies), I am assuming that he is from India (please note: Akshat is a male India name). So any of you who are providing advice on this thread will need to take that into account.

To the OP: am I correct?

Note to all on this thread: I have checked the OP's info and he is indeed from India. Therefore, the specifics of the Indian educational system needs to be taken into account when providing advice.
Yes, I am from India but I am not studying the indian system of education. It is IGCSE by Cambridge And yes it is international baccalaureate.
 

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