Can I Get a Computer Engineering Degree at 25?

In summary: I think getting a CS degree from a university is a good idea. It will increase your chances of getting an engineering job and will also give you some experience in the engineering field. Additionally, doing two bachelors is not a good idea. It will likely mark you as a "serial student" and may delay your graduation.
  • #1
KamenRiderTorbjorn
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I'm 25 and still at a community college taking general ed classes. I haven't taken any pre engineering classes and I'm currently in algebra and will be taking calculus 1 in the fall *fingers crossed*. I want to get a degree in computer engineering and I was wondering how long do u think that'll take me?
 
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  • #2
I see no reason why it would take you anything other than the normal 4 years, do you?
 
  • #3
You say
KamenRiderTorbjorn said:
still at a community college taking general ed classes.

How long have you been doing this? Is there some reason you have not moved toward the engineering degree you say you want?
 
  • #4
Dr.D said:
You sayHow long have you been doing this? Is there some reason you have not moved toward the engineering degree you say you want?
I fell into a deep depression earlier on in college after I got arrested (thats a different story) and also tried to avoid math until I sucked it up and started studying and practicing it.
 
  • #5
A BS degree is based on 4 years of study if you take a "normal" course load. Of course that can be reduced by your transfer credits from your JC. You should be able to see the normal workload and required courses from the university. You can then compare this to the courses you think you'll get transfer credit for and the rate you have been working at your JC, compared to the "normal" JC work load.

Also, doesn't your JC have counselors that you can ask about this? They'll know more than we will about your specific circumstances.
 
  • #6
Or I could put on my psychiatrist hat (don't be fooled!) and ask you to list the reasons why you think it might not be possible for you...
I truly think what matters is that you want to know the stuff, either as an end itself or a means to an end.
 
  • #7
Possible? Sure.

Assessing probabilities is a different challenge and even getting into the right ballpark requires more data.

From my experience, the probability of earning a STEM degree usually has several components:
1. The student's abilities in math and science.
2. The student's work ethic - a combination of habits and desire.
3. The student's life situation - can they treat college like a 40-60 hour per week job for 4+ years?
4. The student's finances - at some point the financial situation can change and focus takes a hit.

Illness and injury can also interfere, but most often it seems to be a combination of the 4 components above.
 
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  • #8
I thought about this yesterday as well. So I'm initially pursuing a CS degree and plan on going to Western Governors University. I was wondering is it possible to maybe go back for a second bachelors and get it in engineering once I complete the CS degree?
 
  • #9
If an engineering degree is your goal, why not go straight for it?
 
  • #10
Its mainly because of money. I'm trying to graduate with less debt as possible and getting a CS from WGU is a more affordable option
 
  • #11
How does an engineering degree plus a "cheap" CS degree end up being cheaper than just an engineering degree?
 
  • #12
Some electrical engineering programs are pretty heavy on computing and software engineering. I am strongly considering this choice actually. Perhaps it's a better choice than doing two bachelor's degrees.
 
  • #13
lately I've been just looking for a way to be done with school. which is why i want to do wgu since going the engineering route will take a few more years
 
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  • #14
If you're looking to be done with school, I can't say getting into an engineering program is a good idea. They are quite intensive and many people drop out or transfer due to the high demands.
 
  • #15
You say you want an engineering degree and to be done with school. You can't have both.
 
  • #16
KamenRiderTorbjorn said:
I thought about this yesterday as well. So I'm initially pursuing a CS degree and plan on going to Western Governors University. I was wondering is it possible to maybe go back for a second bachelors and get it in engineering once I complete the CS degree?
An important part of decision making is to identify fantasy from reality. As I understand it, you have two options:

Community College - CS degree - job

Community College - CE degree - job

Doing two bachelors is fantasy. I did quite a bit of IT recruitment in my time and having two degrees is a bad idea. It'll possibly mark you out as a "serial student".
 
  • #17
PeroK said:
An important part of decision making is to identify fantasy from reality. As I understand it, you have two options:

Community College - CS degree - job

Community College - CE degree - job

Doing two bachelors is fantasy. I did quite a bit of IT recruitment in my time and having two degrees is a bad idea. It'll possibly mark you out as a "serial student".
Since you put it that way then I'll ask this and anyone can chime in, does a computer engineering degree opens more doors for employment than a CS degree or is it about the same?
 
  • #18
KamenRiderTorbjorn said:
I'm 25 and still at a community college taking general ed classes. I haven't taken any pre engineering classes and I'm currently in algebra and will be taking calculus 1 in the fall *fingers crossed*. I want to get a degree in computer engineering and I was wondering how long do u think that'll take me?
It depends.

My experience is similar to yours. I will share mine, and hopefully it helps you in some shape or form.

When I was in 9th grade, maybe 4 months in. I dropped out of school. I did not think it was topical nor relevant. I grew up really poor. I did not think I was able to attend college due to not having the means to do so, or so I thought. Since community college and financial existed, but it was unbeknownst to me.

Tired of working menial jobs, I got my GED at 20, and started community college at 21. I placed in arithmetic, and the math sequence was arithmetic, pre-algebra, algebra, geometry, trig,pre-calculus, and up. I decided to major in mathematics in pre-algebra.

Anyways, it it took me 4 years to finish up to linear algebra and ordinary differential equations ( the highest classes available at CC), the intro physics sequence, and to fill the transfer requirements. Classes above trigonometry were not offered in short semesters. It took me another 3 years to finish the requirements for my BS in mathematics.It is doable, but you have to put in the effort. I say it all depends on the course load. But, from where it seems you are at, maybe 3 years to transfer. Assuming you do not repeat classes, and classes for your major are not offered in short semesters.

Add 2 or maybe 3 years once at the university (if you do not repeat classes).
 
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Related to Can I Get a Computer Engineering Degree at 25?

1. Can I still pursue a computer engineering degree at the age of 25?

Yes, it is never too late to pursue a degree in computer engineering. Many universities and colleges offer programs specifically designed for adult learners or individuals who are returning to school later in life.

2. Will my age affect my chances of getting accepted into a computer engineering program?

No, your age will not affect your chances of being accepted into a computer engineering program. Admissions are based on a variety of factors such as academic performance, relevant experience, and personal statements.

3. Will I be at a disadvantage compared to younger students in the program?

No, age does not determine one's ability to learn and succeed in a computer engineering program. Your dedication, hard work, and determination are what will ultimately drive your success in the program.

4. Can I balance a full-time job and pursue a computer engineering degree at the same time?

It is possible to balance a full-time job and pursue a computer engineering degree, but it may require strong time management skills and dedication. Many universities offer part-time or online programs to accommodate working professionals.

5. Are there any scholarships or financial aid available for adult learners pursuing a computer engineering degree?

Yes, there are various scholarships and financial aid options available for adult learners pursuing a computer engineering degree. It is recommended to research and apply for these opportunities to help finance your education.

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