Can I PhD in astronomy with an electronics engg degree?

  • #1
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Hi, I am currently studying electronics engineering in India and I plan to start applying for the fall 2013 semester within the next 2-3 weeks. I am pursuing a Masters' and PhD in astronomy and I will apply for the same. However, if I do not get an admit for this course from the universities I apply to, can I go for a Masters' in ECE and go for PhD in astronomy? I know instrumentation is a big part of astronomy but in academic terms, would I have a good chance to pursue research?
 

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  • #3
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I have read the thread, however I feel this question (in my case) is different from the points mentioned there. While my major subject in my applications will be physics and astronomy, in case I fail to get an admit and as a back up I take up a Masters' course in electrical engineering, can I get a PhD in astronomy after that?
 
  • #4
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No, you can't.

(And I think you should read that thread more carefully)
 
  • #5
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No, you can't.

(And I think you should read that thread more carefully)
Yes he can.

I know a math major who is doing her master in electrical engineering.

A physics professor who specializes in theoretical particle physics at my university did his undergrad in electrical engineering.

With an EE background he'd be good to do astronomical instrumentation or programming, I know of a few people who've done this.

I notice you're quick to dismiss people switching disciplines even though it's been done several times already.
 
  • #6
eri
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While you can switch disciplines, you need to make up for a great deal of missing coursework. A PhD program in astronomy assumes you've got a bachelors and masters in physics or astrophysics. You can't just jump into a research program in a field if you have no background in it. You must first take the required undergraduate and masters level classes - the PhD is going to require you pass a qualifying exam testing you on all the material you should have learned in those classes you didn't take.
 
  • #7
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While you can switch disciplines, you need to make up for a great deal of missing coursework. You can't just jump into a research program in a field if you have no background in it.
So what? This is basically what my math major friend did, she did math bs and a minor in physics, made up only the relevant electronics coursework is now in an electrical engineering masters program doing nanotechnology; guess she should quit right?
 
  • #8
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The point was to get him to read the thread he was pointed to, which covers situations almost identical to his.
 
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