Can moisture be repel or attract using forces?

  • Thread starter kevin_tee
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  • #1
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Main Question or Discussion Point

Can moisture be repel or attract using some kind of force field such as electric field without actually blowing it, is it possible to separate air and moisture? Does centrifuge force strong enough to separate it? Or is it any other ways to separate moisture form air? Thanks alot.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #3
Khashishi
Science Advisor
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In equilibrium, gas molecules will partition themselves in a column of air in accordance with a Boltzmann distribution. A centrifuge creates an artificial gravity, so heavier molecules will be moved to the outside. In air, you have mostly N2 (28), O2 (32), H2O (18). The atomic masses are in parentheses. So H2O would be sucked to the inside. But then something weird happens. If it condenses on the inside, the liquid water is very dense and will get thrown to the outside, where it could evaporate again. Maybe if you collect it at the outside, it would work. I have no idea.
 
  • #4
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I think significant condensation would require really powerful centrifuges unless the humidity is very close to 100%. Something like a few hundred meters/second velocity at the outer edge of the centrifuge chambers.
 
  • #6
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Thanks for answering, most common way to condense water is to cool it, but I don't want to use this method, I am thinking of using electrostatic charge to condense water. Is that possible? I got an idea from electrostatic precipitator, will that work for water vapor? Thank?
 

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