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Canadian Physics Graduate Programs

  1. Jan 5, 2010 #1
    Hi! I am new here. I am currently an undergraduate in China, majoring in physics. I am in my final year, and I am applying for physics PhD programs in North American. I have chosen some institutions in the US, and I am considering adding one or two Canadian institutions.

    However, unlike American institutions, I find it hard to find ranking information for Canadian physics graduate programs. So I am posting here, asking for suggestions and advice.

    From http://www.topuniversities.com/, I find a ranking for natural sciences. The highest three Canadian institutions are University of Toronto, University of British Columbia and McGill University. However, I cannot find any information in details or specific information for physics.

    My interest mainly lies in condensed matter physics and computational physics. I am especially interested in computer simulations and statistical physics. Would you please offer me some suggestions?

    Thank you very much!
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 6, 2010 #2
    For many Canadian universities, you apply to a professor rather than to the entire department, as is most common in U.S. universities. With this in mind, you should look for professors that are very well-known internationally and cited often.

    Sorry I don't know much about Canadian research on condensed matter and computational physics.
  4. Jan 6, 2010 #3
    Thank you! So you mean I should visit their websites and find professors who are highly reputed in the specific area and with research areas that I am interested in?
  5. Jan 6, 2010 #4


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    One hint as to how good a department is in a particular area of research is how many reputable professors they have in the field. For example, books and articles published, number of Canadian research chairs held, etc. Before applying, you should always do research on the faculty. I know on some applications for grad schools, it is not uncommon where you select your own supervisor.

    McGill is good in HEP and condensed matter physics. U of T is good in condensed matter and quantum optics. I'm saying this because some guys I did undergrad with applied to these schools in those particular fields because according to them, these schools have a very good rep.

    Best of luck!
  6. Jan 6, 2010 #5
    I will do more investigations.

    Thank you very much! :smile:
  7. Jan 7, 2010 #6
    I'd also look at the Perimeter Institute, they have graduate programs in collaboration with a lot of schools, specifically and mostly the University of Waterloo.

    But thats a more theoretical route.
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