Canadians: Ready to Roll Up the Rim and Win with Your Coffee?

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In summary, the coffee at Tim Horton's is generally not as good as Dunkin' Donuts. However, if you are a dedicated coffee drinker, and live in or travel to Canada, Tim Horton's is a decent option.
  • #1
MATLABdude
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Lately, I've been liking my coffee with a Roll-up-able Rim. You may need to be Canadian to get it (and probably need to be Canadian to win!)
http://rolluptherimtowin.com/
 
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  • #2


tim hortons coffee with two sugars tastes like sugar water. but i get to roll up the rim so its a compromise.

ideally, 18% cream and a moderate amount of sugar.
 
  • #3


So far, I've won six free drinks.
 
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  • #4


George Jones said:
So far, I've won six free drinks.

After writing this, I won a doughnut.
 
  • #5
George Jones said:
I like my coffee run through a molecular re-arranger that outputs tea.

So far, I've won six free drinks.

The global odds are only like 1 in 7 of winning anything! Then again, I guess that only works out to like 42 coffees (less with the extra large) over the past 2-3 weeks...
 
  • #6


George Jones said:
After writing this, I won a doughnut.

I drink from timmies almost every day and I haven't won a thing for 2 years. The last thing I won was a free muffin or something. Rediculous. My dad and cousin on the other hand have both won $100 tim cards.

Maybe I'm due to win the Rav-4? :wink:
 
  • #7
haha. i would say I've bought 15 drinks so far. Haven't won anything. the odds are 1 in 9 i believe. but i bought a hot chocolate for my girlfriend, and she won, and kept the free coffee. so that means I am 0 for 14 when i buy me drinks, and she's 1 for 1 when i buy her drinks. unfortunate results lol.
 
  • #8


George Jones said:
After writing this, I won a doughnut.

I get approximately fifteen large teas a week from Tim's. On my last tea from Tim's yesterday, I won a doughnut; on my first tea from Tim's today, I won a drink.

Current total: seven drinks and one doughnut.

For me, Tim's is too conveniently located. I just timed it and found that the nearest Tim's is an 80 second indoor walk from my office. Eighteen months ago, I started to make an effort to decrease (but not eliminate) my consumption of ice caps and doughnuts, and I have lost ten pounds. Going from three (large) roti (and salan) for supper to two also helped.
 
  • #9
where do you live? I've purchased a whole bunch of large coffees and one of my co workers has a conspiracy that they don't put as many winners in large cups as they do mediums. But now hearing that you buy larges and win a lot, she is wonder if geographical location has somethign to do with it.
 
  • #10
dacruick said:
where do you live?

According to my Physics Forums profile, I live in Saint John, New Brunswick :wink:.

My second and third teas today were both "PLEASE PLAY AGAIN." According to my sister's husband, this message contains a spelling mistake, one too many "L"s.
 
  • #11
haha kudos to your sisters husband. and sorry i didnt think to check your profile.
 
  • #12
George Jones said:
My second and third teas today were both "PLEASE PLAY AGAIN." According to my sister's husband, this message contains a spelling mistake, one too many "L"s.

Hahahahahaha, that's pretty funny.
 
  • #13
We have Tim's in Maine too, but I prefer my home-made espresso and rarely buy a coffee from anywhere.
 
  • #14
tim horonts coffee isn't that good anyways. youre not missing a whole lot.
 
  • #15
There were Tim Horton's in MI when I lived there too (not far from the Canadian border). They were okay, but not as good as Dunkin' Donuts (except for the French Cruller doughnuts, which were WAY better at Tim's). But, now I have neither. I can do without the bad coffee, but I REALLY miss the doughnuts.
 
  • #16
The sad part, Moonbear, is if you ask a large segment of the Canadian population whether or not Tim Horton's makes good coffee, they'll resoundingly say, "Yes". I know. Sad but true.

Okay, does it count in this thread if three of the people I was a kids' hockey game with, who were drinking Timmy's coffee, each won a free coffee?
 
  • #17
GeorginaS said:
The sad part, Moonbear, is if you ask a large segment of the Canadian population whether or not Tim Horton's makes good coffee, they'll resoundingly say, "Yes". I know. Sad but true.

In their defense, when I used to have to drag myself out of bed sometime between midnight and 3 AM to head to the farm for an experiment, and the Tim Horton's was only a block from my apartment, that large cup of coffee was pretty darned good! :biggrin: It was certainly better than the gas station a few blocks further, and it was faster to run into Tim Horton's than to wait for my own coffee to brew.

I had my second cup of coffee after I got to the farm (we had all the essentials there -- coffee maker, microwave, fridge), and my third, fourth, fifth, etc. Of course, that was back when I could grab a couple of those doughnuts, and snack on a million other things all day long and never gain an ounce.
 
  • #18
GeorginaS said:
The sad part, Moonbear, is if you ask a large segment of the Canadian population whether or not Tim Horton's makes good coffee, they'll resoundingly say, "Yes". I know. Sad but true.

Okay, does it count in this thread if three of the people I was a kids' hockey game with, who were drinking Timmy's coffee, each won a free coffee?

I think it's a function of the ubiquity of Tim Hortons:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tim_Hortons

A Tim Horton's for every 10,000 Canadians (and driving around town sometimes, it feels like there's one every few blocks!)

They've established themselves as a fixture and Canadian institution. Even though they might not have the best coffee ever, it's definitely something that people are familiar with, oftentimes where we'd go for the hot chocolate / coffee / tea while growing up, and, because of all that, kinda comforting sometimes.
 
  • #19
MATLABdude said:
I think it's a function of the ubiquity of Tim Hortons:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tim_Hortons

A Tim Horton's for every 10,000 Canadians (and driving around town sometimes, it feels like there's one every few blocks!)

They've established themselves as a fixture and Canadian institution. Even though they might not have the best coffee ever, it's definitely something that people are familiar with, oftentimes where we'd go for the hot chocolate / coffee / tea while growing up, and, because of all that, kinda comforting sometimes.

I live in a small Alberta city of about 60,000 people. We have three Tim Horton's. We have two Second Cups and five Starbucks. (Although I don't think two of the Starbucks count for this discussion because one is inside of a Safeway and one is inside of a Chapters.) Of all of these places, each and every morning, Tim Horton's has a line-up at the drive-through. Every single morning. Those places are like a license to print cash.
 
  • #20
I won another drink today.

Current total: eight drinks and one doughnut.
 
  • #21
As of this morning, I'd won a doughnut and a coffee in 20 tries. I was able to string a win of wins together one year (free coffee leading to free coffee around four or five times in a row), but no such luck this year.
 
  • #22
Another win today. I had one Tim Horton's tea yesterday and one today, and both were winners. My wife, who buys coffees at about one-third the rate that I buy teas, has yet to win.

Current total: nine drinks and one doughnut.
 
  • #23
Why would you get coffee in cups?

I have a big mug, they only charge for medium and I get like more than large. I only need it two times and it serves me for more than 10 hours (5 hours per mug of coffee)
 
  • #24
rootX said:
Why would you get coffee in cups?

I have a big mug, they only charge for medium and I get like more than large. I only need it two times and it serves me for more than 10 hours (5 hours per mug of coffee)

I likewise do that. However, you can still get a cup with purchase. Isn't that defeating one of the purposes of a refill, to reduce amount of waste? Sort of, but I typically just recycle the whole (non-coffee stained) stack at the end of the contest.

EDIT: Gotnuthin': 2 for 21.
 
  • #25
Three more drinks and one more doughnut; my wife still has yet to win; someone I know won a $100 card.

A week ago, 1000 unused roll up the rim cups were stolen from outside of my work Tim Hortons.

Current total: 12 drinks and two doughnuts.
 
  • #26
GeorginaS said:
I live in a small Alberta city of about 60,000 people. We have three Tim Horton's. We have two Second Cups and five Starbucks. (Although I don't think two of the Starbucks count for this discussion because one is inside of a Safeway and one is inside of a Chapters.) Of all of these places, each and every morning, Tim Horton's has a line-up at the drive-through. Every single morning. Those places are like a license to print cash.

The bottom line is people like weak tasting coffee. I probably buy more coffee from tim hortons than i do from anywhere else, even though I preach how crappy their coffee is. Its a mix between cheapness, convenience, and a lot of people like their coffee to taste like half coffee half sugar water. I'm also about 2/18, fortunately I've won 2 RAV4s. I know, what are the chances:smile:
 
  • #27
First WIN COFFEE!
 

1. What is "Roll Up the Rim and Win"?

"Roll Up the Rim and Win" is a popular promotion by Tim Hortons, a Canadian coffee chain, where customers can roll up the rim of their coffee cup for a chance to win prizes, such as free coffee, donuts, or even a car.

2. When does "Roll Up the Rim and Win" typically take place?

The promotion usually takes place during the springtime, usually from late February to early April. However, the exact dates may vary depending on the year.

3. How do I participate in "Roll Up the Rim and Win"?

To participate, simply purchase a coffee from Tim Hortons and check the rim of your cup. If it says "WIN" or displays a prize, you can claim your prize at any Tim Hortons location. If it does not display a prize, you can still enter the online contest for a chance to win additional prizes.

4. Are there any restrictions or limitations to "Roll Up the Rim and Win"?

Yes, there are a few restrictions and limitations. The promotion is only open to legal residents of Canada who are 13 years or older. Prizes must be claimed by a certain date and there is a limit of one prize per person, per day. Additionally, there are certain restrictions on claiming prizes for residents of Quebec due to provincial laws.

5. How likely am I to win a prize in "Roll Up the Rim and Win"?

The chances of winning a prize in "Roll Up the Rim and Win" depend on the number of participants and the total number of prizes available. Tim Hortons typically offers millions of prizes during the promotion, so while winning a major prize may be unlikely, there is still a good chance of winning a smaller prize. However, this may vary each year.

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