Career Advice: Should I Pursue Physics or Stay in Engineering?

  • Thread starter ythamsten
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Career
In summary, Brazilian scientists, such as mathematicians and physicists, are very underestimated and it is frustrating because it seems like nobody else is like that. When got to engineering, I thought I would find more people like me, but instead, the things that I've been hearing are ''How do you know all that stuff?'', ''You like it way too much!'' and such. So in my head, I'm quite in doubt if I am in the place that I really should be... I don't want to do something just because it gives more money, but because I'm passionate about it. There exists the possibility to take an extra year and graduate in physics after completing engineering, so I was thinking to do that, instead of
  • #1
ythamsten
16
0
Hello guys, I live in Brazil and I'm currently in my first year of EE. As you all might already know, here in Brazil, scientists, such as mathematicians and physicists, are very underestimated. Usually, if you are good at math and physics, you are strongly encouraged to do engineering, because that's what gives more money over here. And there is the thing that have been bothering me for some time...
I've always been very good at math and physics, and even more than that, I always was interested in learning this specific subjects more deeply. When I was in high school, it was very frustrating because seemed like nobody else was like that. When got to engineering I thought I would find more people like me, whom math and physics are the biggest passion on their lives. But instead, the things that I've been hearing are ''How do you know all that stuff?'', ''You like it way too much!'' and such. So in my head, I'm quite in doubt if I am in the place that I really should be... I don't want to do something just because it gives more money, but because I'm passionate about it. There exists the possibility to take an extra year and graduate in physics after completing engineering, so I was thinking to do that, instead of straight switching... I really feel the need to learn things with a theoretical approach, but I can just picture me in the future working as an engineer, and not only that, I don't want to be a teacher in anyway. My biggest dream is to work with research. So what do you guys think I should do?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
If you are really good at it, switch to what you like. You can go to grad school with an EE degree (I did it.),
but you're better off switching nw.
 
  • #3
Regardless of what endeavor you choose in your life, you will be teaching someone. It may not be in a formal class setting. You may find yourself mentoring, writing, speaking in public, documenting, and the like. But you will be a teacher.

No discovery, or feat of design is worth a damn if you can't describe it for others and eventually train someone to replace you. So get over yourself regarding your dislike of teaching. You will never be able to get away from needing to teach, particularly if you're successful.

Now as to your primary question, you may want to find another school. I'm not suggesting you leave Brazil. It is a big country, with significant resources. However, from what you describe, I get the impression that you need to find people of like mind to help you make that decision. You are not in that crowd, so find it; and you will then figure out what you want to do.
 
  • #4
What you said Jake, reflects exactly what has been in my mind... I just want to apologize for my misplacement: I don't want to be a teacher in a classroom, giving lectures on things that I love for people that seem to don't be interested at all on that (this is the way people over here seems), and act like they are just there to get money after 5 years, you know what I'm saying? I study in a Federal university here that is highly regarded, but I think that a change of scenery would be a good idea... Thank you very much for your advice.
 
  • #5


I understand your dilemma and I can offer some advice based on my experience and knowledge in the field of physics and engineering. First of all, it is important to follow your passion and pursue a career that truly interests you. Money should not be the main factor in your decision, as a career in either physics or engineering can be financially rewarding if you excel in your field.

That being said, it is also important to consider the job market and opportunities in your country. While it may be true that engineers are in higher demand and may have better job prospects in Brazil, it is also important to note that the field of physics is constantly evolving and there may be a growing demand for physicists in the future. It is important to do some research and talk to professionals in both fields to get a better understanding of the job market and opportunities in your country.

Furthermore, it is possible to combine your passion for physics with your engineering degree. Many engineering fields, such as electrical engineering, involve a strong understanding of physics principles. You can also consider pursuing a graduate degree in physics after completing your engineering degree, as this will give you a strong theoretical background and open up opportunities for research.

Ultimately, the decision should be based on what you truly enjoy and what will make you happy in the long run. If your passion lies in physics and research, then it may be worth considering pursuing a degree in physics after completing your engineering degree. However, if you enjoy engineering and can see yourself working in that field, then it may be best to stick with it and find ways to incorporate your passion for physics into your work.

I would also encourage you to not let the opinions of others discourage you from pursuing your interests. Being passionate about math and physics is a great strength and it is important to surround yourself with people who support and encourage your interests. I wish you all the best in your decision and future career.
 

Related to Career Advice: Should I Pursue Physics or Stay in Engineering?

1. What are the main differences between a career in physics and a career in engineering?

A career in physics involves conducting research and studying the fundamental laws of nature, while a career in engineering focuses on applying scientific principles to design and create practical solutions for real-world problems.

2. Which field offers better job opportunities and salary potential?

Both physics and engineering have a wide range of career opportunities and high salary potential. However, engineering tends to have more job openings and higher starting salaries, while physics careers may have more opportunities for research and academic positions.

3. What skills and interests are necessary for a successful career in physics or engineering?

A successful career in physics requires strong analytical and mathematical skills, as well as a passion for understanding the natural world. In engineering, skills in problem-solving, creativity, and attention to detail are essential, along with an interest in designing and building solutions.

4. Can I pursue a career in both physics and engineering simultaneously?

It is possible to have a career that combines elements of both physics and engineering, such as working as a research engineer or a physicist for a technology company. However, it may require additional education or training in both fields.

5. What factors should I consider when deciding between pursuing physics or engineering?

When deciding between the two fields, it is important to consider your interests, strengths, and career goals. You should also research the job market and explore different career paths to determine which field aligns best with your skills and aspirations.

Similar threads

  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
21
Views
1K
  • STEM Career Guidance
2
Replies
62
Views
4K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
11
Views
1K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
19
Views
820
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
2
Views
682
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
2
Views
2K
Replies
18
Views
4K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
20
Views
2K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
4
Views
867
Back
Top