Career in Physics: M.Tech vs Quantum Mechanics

In summary, having an M.Tech degree may provide a similar level of knowledge and understanding in quantum mechanics as a major in the subject, depending on the books and resources used. However, to fully understand quantum field theory, an additional three to four years of work may be required. It should also be noted that quantum mechanics is not a standalone major, but rather a tool used in research.
  • #1
khil_phys
93
0
If I had an M.Tech degree, would I get the same amount of knowledge and understanding of quantum mechanics which I would have got had I done a major in Quantum mechanics or other related branches?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
khil_phys said:
If I had an M.Tech degree, would I get the same amount of knowledge and understanding of quantum mechanics which I would have got had I done a major in Quantum mechanics or other related branches?

Depends what books you read. With a bachelor's degree you likely won't be doing quantum field theory, but you'll be able to do schoredinger equation calculations, and that's enough to understand what you don't understand.

If you want to learn QFT, that's another three to four years of work.

Also QM is one of those things that the more you learn, the less you understand.
 
  • #3
Quantum mechanics isn't a major anymore then Algebra is a major.
 
  • #4
Quantum Mechanics is now and has been a tool used in research.
 
  • #5
What's an M.Tech?
 
  • #6
twofish-quant said:
Depends what books you read. With a bachelor's degree you likely won't be doing quantum field theory, but you'll be able to do schoredinger equation calculations, and that's enough to understand what you don't understand.

So what you mean to say is that having an M.Tech degree is the same as doing a masters in QM or QFT.
 

1. What is the difference between M.Tech and Quantum Mechanics in terms of a career in physics?

M.Tech (Master of Technology) is a postgraduate program that focuses on the practical application of technology and engineering principles. It is a broader field that includes various specializations such as electronics, computer science, and mechanical engineering. On the other hand, quantum mechanics is a specific branch of physics that deals with the behavior of matter and energy at a subatomic level. A career in M.Tech would involve working in industries such as manufacturing, telecommunications, and software development, while a career in quantum mechanics would involve research and teaching in the field of quantum physics.

2. Which one is better for a career in physics, M.Tech or Quantum Mechanics?

The answer to this question depends on your interests and career goals. If you are interested in pursuing a career in research and academia, then quantum mechanics would be a better choice. However, if you are more inclined towards practical applications of physics in industries, then M.Tech would be a better option. Both fields have their own advantages and it is important to choose the one that aligns with your interests and career goals.

3. Can I pursue M.Tech after completing a degree in Quantum Mechanics?

Yes, you can pursue M.Tech after completing a degree in quantum mechanics. Many universities offer M.Tech programs in various specializations of physics, including quantum mechanics. However, you may have to fulfill certain prerequisites or take additional courses to be eligible for the M.Tech program, depending on the university's requirements.

4. What job opportunities are available for M.Tech graduates in the field of physics?

M.Tech graduates in physics have a wide range of job opportunities available to them. They can work in industries such as electronics, telecommunications, software development, and manufacturing. Some common job roles for M.Tech graduates in physics include research scientist, data analyst, software engineer, and product development engineer. Additionally, they can also pursue careers in academia and research institutes.

5. Is it necessary to have an M.Tech degree to work in the field of quantum mechanics?

No, it is not necessary to have an M.Tech degree to work in the field of quantum mechanics. Many universities and research institutes offer graduate programs in quantum mechanics, such as MSc or PhD, which can lead to a career in this field. However, having an M.Tech degree can provide a strong foundation in practical applications of physics, which can be beneficial for a career in quantum mechanics.

Similar threads

  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
11
Views
695
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
21
Views
3K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
5
Views
656
Replies
17
Views
1K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
4
Views
576
  • STEM Career Guidance
2
Replies
62
Views
3K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
10
Views
727
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
1
Views
6K
  • STEM Career Guidance
Replies
18
Views
2K
Back
Top