Careers in science doing science

In summary, the conversation discussed the speaker's question about career options that involve science and hands-on work. They also mentioned their preference for physical work over coding and the challenges of finding a job without business-related tasks. However, they were advised to narrow down their interests to find specific job opportunities in their desired field.
  • #1
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Sorry if this topic name is a bit vague.

Anyway, my question is what kind of careers can one go into, where the trajectory still lies on the science side? I noticed most of my relatives who studied engineering have moved over to the business side (more powerpoints/emails). Or rather, a path where there is a high ceiling even for those of us who want to stay on the science side.

Another issue is my preference is for working with my hands. I don't mind coding, but I'd rather play with the soldering iron and endmill than playing with a compiler.
I noticed two-fish has mentioned his career in finance being like a permanent graduate student, but all the fields I've seen have been more software/coding; not as hands-y as I'd like. I've seen a few science jobs that pay 6 figs (fluid modeling and DSP), but again, these are more computational than hands-y.
 
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  • #2
flemmyd said:
(more powerpoints/emails).

In industry, and academia, a large part of your job nowadays is always going to be making presentations, writing reports and sending/replying to emails. You need to be able to tell people why they should pay you, and you need to do it often.


flemmyd said:
I don't mind coding, but I'd rather play with the soldering iron and endmill than playing with a compiler.

Computational work is a good way to get things done. In the physical science areas I am familiar with, the engineers/scientists handle the design/implementation. The actual building is usually done by technicians. It depends what you want to do. You might do well to look at narrowing down your potential area of interest, i.e. something more specific than "use my hands" since then you could at least look at specific employers and try to find jobs that are relevant. There are likely plenty of jobs out there with hands-on science work, but you'll do well to find a position that exists without the 'business' part of it.
 

1. What types of careers are available in the field of science?

There are a wide variety of careers available in the field of science, including research scientists, lab technicians, science educators, science writers, science policy experts, and many more. Depending on your interests and skills, you can find a fulfilling career in a range of industries, such as healthcare, technology, environmental science, and more.

2. What education and training is required for a career in science?

Most careers in science require at least a bachelor's degree in a related field, such as biology, chemistry, physics, or engineering. Many positions also require advanced degrees, such as a master's or Ph.D. Depending on the specific field, additional training and certification may be necessary.

3. What skills and qualities are important for a successful career in science?

Some important skills and qualities for a successful career in science include critical thinking, problem-solving, attention to detail, strong communication skills, and a passion for learning and discovery. Collaboration, adaptability, and creativity are also valuable traits in the field of science.

4. What are some potential challenges of a career in science?

Like any career, there are challenges associated with working in the field of science. These may include long hours, tight deadlines, and the need for continual learning and adaptation as new technologies and discoveries emerge. Additionally, securing funding for research projects can be a challenge for scientists.

5. How can I find job opportunities in the field of science?

There are several ways to find job opportunities in the field of science. Networking with professionals in your desired field can be a valuable resource, as well as searching job boards and company websites. You can also consider internships or volunteering to gain experience and make connections in the industry.

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