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Casimir effect - Does it fit? Or NOT?

  1. Aug 7, 2007 #1
    I just heard about the Casimir effect:

    Is this for real? Or is it just speculation?
    If it's real, then how in the name of science does it fit into the four fundamental forces?!

    I think it's just a fancy name for friction. I think friction is an example of electromagnetic force, same
    as the pressure of standing on the floor. But I could be wrong! The pressure of standing on the floor could be a result of gravity! So which is it? EM or Gravity ? Or both?! We can't even talk about the Casimir effect (if it even exists) until we can clear up something as simple as standing on the floor. :!!)
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2007
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 7, 2007 #2


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    Casimir effect is very real and there have been numerious experiments attesting the existence of that macroscopic force. That's not something new, it can be interesting, but it's a just a mere effect of EM field quantization in various geometries. As for the 4 forces, well they go hand in hand, since the theory of 4 forces is based on (gauge) field quantization which also explains the existence of the Casimir force.
  4. Aug 7, 2007 #3


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    Here is page by Ulf Leonhardt explaining how manipulating the Casimir effect may allow advances in the reduction of friction in nano-machines.

  5. Aug 7, 2007 #4
    the wiki page must be in error, there is no way that this could be true:

    1 atm over a seperation as large as 100 angstoms? no way
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