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News CNN reporter thinks Copenhagen is the capital of the Netherlands

  1. May 1, 2013 #1

    Monique

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    I thought CNN was a reputable broadcaster, but then a reporter standing on the Dam square in Amsterdam says "you have people from all over the Netherlands coming here, to Copenhagen, to have a great time" (to celebrate the new king). Really, CNN?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 1, 2013 #2
    It's still one of the better American stations, but really most are just entertainment. I prefer Al Jazeera these days.
     
  4. May 1, 2013 #3

    SteamKing

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  5. May 1, 2013 #4
    It's quite normal. The president of the USA once held a speech thanking the European countries for their support for some military action, not only the larger countries (UK, France, Italy) but also the smaller ones, Norway, Denmark, Belgium.

    Although The Netherlands had contributed relatively the most, per number of capita, it was not mentioned. Maybe it's too hard to pronounce it.
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2013
  6. May 1, 2013 #5

    WannabeNewton

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    Can't wait to see how Jon Stewart rips CNN apart this time. Yey Jon Stewart!
     
  7. May 1, 2013 #6

    SteamKing

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    You've got Holland and the Netherlands, then who are the Dutch? It's all very confusing.
     
  8. May 1, 2013 #7
    Bold Mine. That is merely someone's opinion.

    I hate to see an adult grasping at straws. It looks too much like the right wing comments in my local newspaper.

    BTW this was only hours after the grainy pictures had been released by the FBI. That was in the link right?
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2013
  9. May 1, 2013 #8

    AlephZero

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    It's too easy to get the impression from US TV and movies that the USA is more or less the same as Europe except they only speak English (or at least, something fairly close to English).

    I remember a time we had some visitors from a US company including an apparently "normal" articulate intelligent college graduate on her first overseas trip. She was absolutely amazed that you could buy American products like Coca Cola in the UK, and there were even McDonalds and KFC.

    We didn't dare let her see the local Walmart/ASDA supermarket - the shock might have been fatal :smile:
     
  10. May 1, 2013 #9

    Evo

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    That's sad that such an idiotic individual would reflect on all Americans. Surely you realized that this person was ignorant, even by American standards.

    When I traveled abroad, I was aware of even little things like product names. I knew in Japan that diet coke was "Coke lite" because the seat of government in Japan was the "Diet", in English.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2013
  11. May 2, 2013 #10

    Danger

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    That's saying a lot.
    Something used to happen when I lived back east. (Once is unbelievable enough, but I know of three instances and have heard of more.) We used to hang out in Windsor for our "cruising" days. This happened in the middle of July. It was 35° (95°F) with 99% humidity. A carload of Yanks came across the border with skis on the roof and asked where the snow was. We told them to turn around and go back in the direction that they had come from for about 900 miles. (Windsor is south of Detroit. :rolleyes:)
    Those directions would actually have plopped them into the middle of Hudson Bay, but anyone that stupid deserves to drown.
    Then there was the guy that Customs caught with two mortars and an RPG in his trunk. He claimed that he was going hunting... (Yeah... for Brinks trucks...)

    Evo: Remember that other problem that Coke had in Japan? They had to drop the "Coke adds life" campaign because the translation promised to bring one's ancestors back from the dead.
     
  12. May 2, 2013 #11

    Evo

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    LOL. Well, we can't be held responsible for foreign translations, well, not too much, but the fact that Americans are *unaware* of the world outside of their own small neighborhood probably isn't that unusual. We would hope that Americans read the news and are "global citizens" when realistically, the average populace of other countries are just as ignorant. It just stings when someone that should know better turns out to be a complete ignoramus.

    In the case cited by AlephZero, no American employee should be sent to a foreign country without a thorough briefing on the country to which they are going. That is negligence on the part of the employer and stupidity on the part of the employee.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2013
  13. May 2, 2013 #12

    Monique

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    The English speakers have made it difficult, in the native language it's easy: I live in "Nederland", I am a "Nederlander", and I speak "Nederlands". Couldn't be simper. Holland are two provinces of the Netherlands (North and South), they became famous in the 17th century (Golden Age) when sailors from the sea-bordering provinces set out to discover the planet. Dutch comes from the meaning "nation", in old Dutch this was called "dietsc", in old German "diutsch" (where the German word Deutsch comes from).

    Many times I have encountered people who think Amsterdam is in Denmark and that the Danish speak Dutch. I'd expect a CNN reporter to be more educated or at least less confused.

    That's incredible..
     
  14. May 2, 2013 #13

    Danger

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    Agreed, and I mentioned the Coke incident only as a minor point of amusement. My favourite instance was back in the 70's (or possibly early 80's) when they were first trying to automate translation. A hugely powerful computer (for the era; probably less processing power than my Blackberry) was given the phrase "out of sight, out of mind" and told to translate it into Russian. The Russian response then created a feedback loop by being reintroduced to the machine for translation into English. The resultant printout was "The man is blind. He is also insane." If it hadn't been so early, I would have blamed that on Windows.

    edit: Hi, Monique;
    You sneaked in while I was composing.
    I must admit to one particular (out of thousands) point of ignorance regarding your country. Until I looked it up about a week ago, I thought that Dutch was just an informal term for Flemish. It never occurred to me that you are in a bilingual country like ours. :redface:
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2013
  15. May 2, 2013 #14

    Borek

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    In Polish Netherlands is "Holandia", but thank you for blaming others :tongue:
     
  16. May 2, 2013 #15

    Danger

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    And to this day, when I think of the Netherlands I get a bit of a tingle in my nethers because of The Happy Hooker.
     
  17. May 2, 2013 #16

    Monique

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    Where did you look up that information? The time that Flemish was spoken in the Netherlands is several centuries ago in the United Kingdom of the Netherlands. You're confused with Belgium.
     
  18. May 2, 2013 #17

    Danger

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    Well, now I'm just completely baffled. The first time that the issue arose was when I was in the hospital this past November. I recovered consciousness hocking up phlegm like you wouldn't believe. Because of the way my mind works (when it works at all), it immediately went from recognizing phlegm to remembering the term "Flemish". I knew that it was a language, but couldn't figure out where the hell it belonged. There's no Flemland or Flemistan or Uncle Bernie's Flem Arcade. I asked one of my nurses if she knew where it's used and she didn't know. About half an hour later, though, she came back and said that she'd scammed some internet time on the work computer and looked it up. She told me that Flemish was the language of Holland.
    When I looked it up myself last week, in preparation to responding to one of Andre's posts, the source said that Dutch is spoken in the southern part of you country, and Flemish in the north. I thought that it was Wikipedia, but they show nothing of the sort now. Either it was changed or I have no idea of what I was actually logging onto.
     
  19. May 2, 2013 #18
    I'm confused now.
     
  20. May 2, 2013 #19

    Danger

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    It's like Ikea, but with better food.
     
  21. May 2, 2013 #20

    micromass

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    That's pretty weird. The official language of the Netherlands is dutch (although there are many amuzing dialects). Flemish is spoken in Flanders, which is a part of Belgium. Of course, flemish is pretty close to dutch anyway, so officially there is no distinction.
    The country that is split up in two parts is Belgium. The north speaks flemish/dutch and the south speaks French. And there's also a German part.
     
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