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Colorful smoke from burning WHAT?

  1. Mar 31, 2012 #1
    Sorry guys I am not an expert, but I wondered for my general use

    What substances do you know will burn in mild tempratures (4 to 40 C, let's say) simply in the presence of oxygen and fire (spark or surrounding fire) creating prominent colorful fire - hence different from white, gray or black. I heard copper has this feature, but I am not positive about that. Can anyone please help?

    Sorry for bad english...
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 1, 2012 #2

    Borek

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    There are no substances I am aware of that will burn in these temperatures.
     
  4. Apr 1, 2012 #3
    when the surrounding environment (air) is at these tempratures?
     
  5. Apr 1, 2012 #4

    Borek

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    I am not sure what you are asking about. Most combustible things will burn when surrounded by the air at 0-40 deg C.

    Do you want it just to burn in typical circumstances? Like a match, or a torch, or a campfire?
     
  6. Apr 1, 2012 #5

    chemisttree

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    He is asking about pyrophoric materials. Boranes burn with a green flame. All you have to do is to release it into the atmosphere. If you want smoke instead of colored flames that is a different thing altogether.
     
  7. Apr 1, 2012 #6
    Thank you guys for replying! now I know colorful smoke is hard to achieve in normal circumstances... and Chemistree got me all right
     
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