Compression of an object and its length.

In summary, the conversation discusses a claim that shorter foam rollers can withstand greater weight and have less tendency to become deformed compared to longer ones. However, the individual expressing the claim is skeptical as they believe that a smaller surface area would actually result in worse performance. They are seeking clarification and assistance in understanding this claim. Another individual agrees with their analysis and believes that the extra length of the longer roller would not make a significant difference in the pressure applied to the roller. This is assuming that the rollers are made of the same material.
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I have heard a claim that looks a little odd to me and I am hoping that someone can help.
In the gym there are foam rollers people use, some of them are 36 inches long and some are 16 inches. The claim is that the shorter ones can withstand greater weight than longer ones and will have less tendency to become deformed than the longer ones. If i recall the stress on an object is the force divided by the area, so if anything a smaller roller should do worse not better but intuitively i feel it shouldn't make any difference , the section of the roller the person is applying pressure to is basically the same.
Can anyone help in sorting this matter out.
 
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  • #2
windy miller said:
I have heard a claim that looks a little odd to me and I am hoping that someone can help.
In the gym there are foam rollers people use, some of them are 36 inches long and some are 16 inches. The claim is that the shorter ones can withstand greater weight than longer ones and will have less tendency to become deformed than the longer ones. If i recall the stress on an object is the force divided by the area, so if anything a smaller roller should do worse not better but intuitively i feel it shouldn't make any difference , the section of the roller the person is applying pressure to is basically the same.
Can anyone help in sorting this matter out.
I agree w/ your analysis. The idea that a larger surface spreads out an applied force only applies to rigid surfaces and that's not the case for gym mats. Don't see why an extra mile or two of material off to the side would make the slightest difference to the part that pressure is applied to in this case. This assume, of course, that they are made of exactly the same material.
 
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1. What is compression of an object?

Compression of an object is the process of applying force to an object in order to decrease its length. This can happen due to external pressure, weight, or other forces acting on the object.

2. How does compression affect the length of an object?

Compression causes the particles or molecules within an object to move closer together, resulting in a decrease in the object's length. The amount of compression will depend on the strength and duration of the applied force.

3. What factors can affect the amount of compression an object undergoes?

The amount of compression an object undergoes can be affected by various factors, such as the material and shape of the object, the magnitude and direction of the applied force, and the environmental conditions (temperature, pressure, etc.).

4. Can an object return to its original length after being compressed?

In most cases, an object will not return to its original length after being compressed. This is because the particles or molecules within the object have been permanently rearranged due to the applied force. However, certain materials such as rubber are able to return to their original shape and length after being compressed.

5. What are some real-world examples of compression of an object?

Some common examples of compression of an object include squeezing a sponge, stepping on a piece of foam, or using a hydraulic press to compress a metal object. Compression is also commonly used in industrial processes, such as in the production of paper or plastic products.

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