Constant angular acceleration problem

In summary, a constant angular acceleration problem involves calculating the angular acceleration of an object moving in a circular path at a constant rate. This type of problem is commonly encountered in mechanics and can be solved using the formula α = (ωf - ωi) / t. Angular acceleration is different from linear acceleration in that it measures the change in angular velocity over time, while linear acceleration measures the change in linear velocity over time. The direction of the angular velocity does not affect the magnitude of the angular acceleration in a constant angular acceleration problem. Real-life examples of this type of problem include the motion of a Ferris wheel, ceiling fan, and spinning top.
  • #1
Paulhaley2000
1
0
Ok so here is the problem

A centrifuge operates at 3600 rpm. When switched on it rotates 72 times before reaching operational angular speed. Find the constant angular acceleration while its speeding up.

Ok so I already know I needed to convert rpm to rad/sec which I did. I'm stuck here because the formula I have for ang acc is (Change in W)/ time. But I don't know time or ang acc. Thanks for the help btw
 
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  • #2
You don't know the time, but you do know the "distance". The solution is analogous to linear motion in 1 dimension.
 

Related to Constant angular acceleration problem

What is a constant angular acceleration problem?

A constant angular acceleration problem is a type of physics problem that involves calculating the angular acceleration of an object that is moving in a circular path at a constant rate. This type of problem is commonly encountered in mechanics and is used to understand the motion of objects in rotational systems.

How do you calculate the angular acceleration in a constant angular acceleration problem?

The angular acceleration in a constant angular acceleration problem can be calculated using the formula α = (ωf - ωi) / t, where α is the angular acceleration, ωf is the final angular velocity, ωi is the initial angular velocity, and t is the time interval over which the change in angular velocity occurs.

What is the difference between angular acceleration and linear acceleration?

Angular acceleration is the rate at which an object's angular velocity changes over time, while linear acceleration is the rate at which an object's linear velocity changes over time. Angular acceleration is measured in radians per second squared, while linear acceleration is measured in meters per second squared.

How does the direction of the angular velocity affect the angular acceleration in a constant angular acceleration problem?

The direction of the angular velocity does not affect the angular acceleration in a constant angular acceleration problem. The magnitude of the angular acceleration will be the same regardless of the direction of the angular velocity, as long as the object is moving at a constant rate.

What are some real-life examples of constant angular acceleration problems?

Some real-life examples of constant angular acceleration problems include the motion of a Ferris wheel, the rotation of a ceiling fan, and the spinning of a top. These are all situations where an object is moving in a circular path at a constant rate and the angular acceleration can be calculated using the formula mentioned above.

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